First Edition June 21 2012

first_imgFirst Edition: June 21, 2012 Today’s headlines reflect a number of the issues in play as the waiting game continues regarding the Supreme Court’s health law decision. Kaiser Health News: Awaiting The Court Ruling, A Consumer Guide To Health Reform LawKaiser Health News staff writer Mary Agnes Carey reports: “The Supreme Court is expected to rule within a week on some key constitutional challenges brought by states against the 2010 health care overhaul law. The decision will have sweeping ramifications for consumers, state officials, employers and health care providers, including hospitals and doctors” (Carey, 6/20). Read the story.Kaiser Health News: Court Challenge Could Result In Medicaid Cutbacks Instead Of ExpansionKaiser Health News staff writer Phil Galewitz reports: “The future of the nation’s largest health insurance program — Medicaid — hangs in the balance of the Supreme Court’s decision on the 2010 health law. The state-federal program which covers 60 million poor and disabled people would be greatly expanded under the health law, adding 17 million more people starting in 2014” (Galewitz, 6/20). Read the story.Kaiser Health News: Health On The Hill: Political Jockeying In Anticipation Of Supreme Court RulingKaiser Health News staff writers Mary Agnes Carey and Marilyn Werber Serafini talk to Jackie Judd about how each party is positioning itself ahead of a Supreme Court ruling on the health law. Carey says much is at stake while Werber Serafini outlines some of the Republican alternatives to the law (6/20). Watch the video or read the transcript.Kaiser Health News: Capsules: While Awaiting Court’s Decision, HHS Awards Health Center GrantsNow on Kaiser Health News’ blog, Matthew Fleming writes: “Even as attention is focused on the much-anticipated Supreme Court decision regarding the health law’s constitutionality, the Obama administration continues to roll out ‘good news’ announcements related to provisions that have already taken effect. Case in point: The Obama administration Wednesday announced $128.6 million in new grants designed to help community health centers across the country and in some U.S. territories expand their ability to treat patients” (Fleming, 6/20). Check out what else is on the blog.Politico: Health Lobby To Parse Words After DecisionWhen the Supreme Court hands down its ruling on the health care law, it’s game on for K Street. Lawyers and lobbyists are preparing their rapid-response plans to dissect the decision and tell clients what it means. But no matter how quickly people figure out what the court said, don’t expect corporate America to come out spiking the football (Palmer, 6/20).Politico: Neera Tanden: Health Care Ruling Won’t Be The EndA ruling against the health law would energize Democratic voters in the 2012 election, says one prominent backer. And a ruling in favor of it — even if that means at least one Republican-appointed justice upholds it — won’t make its critics suddenly find it politically palatable, said one of the law’s leading foes (Haberkorn, 6/20).The Associated Press/Washington Post: The Possible Impact On Small Businesses After The Supreme Court Rules On Health CareSmall business owners will be watching when the Supreme Court issues its ruling on the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The overhaul of the nation’s health care system requires that by 2014, all businesses with more than 50 employees must provide health care benefits that are deemed affordable under the law (6/20).The Wall Street Journal: Not Just Insurance Is At StakeIt isn’t just large employers, medical businesses and constitutional scholars who are invested in the court’s decision. Chain restaurants, tanning salons, breast-feeding advocacy groups and others far afield of health care have a lot riding on whether the law stays in place (Adamy, 6/20).Politico: Mike Lee: If Health Care Stands, Anything GoesSen. Mike Lee says that if the Supreme Court upholds the Affordable Care Act, Congress’s power would effectively be limitless (Cheney, 6/19).The Wall Street Journal: Health-Care Tax Credit Eludes SomeHundreds of thousands of small businesses are excluded from claiming a health-care tax credit, and many blame overly narrow restrictions. “You’re penalized for giving people a higher wage and a more professional opportunity,” said Michael Griffin, whose St. Louis ad agency offers health-insurance coverage to its six full-time employees (Maltby, 6/20).The Washington Post: Health Insurance Plans Owe $1.1 Billion In RebatesMillions of consumers and businesses will receive $1.1 billion in rebates this summer from health insurance plans that failed to meet a requirement of the new health-care law, according to the Health and Human Services Department (Kliff, 6/20).Los Angeles Times: Not All Republicans Embrace GOP Budget, Medicare ChangesAs both Democrats and Republicans try to make the November election a choice over competing economic visions for the country, not all congressional Republicans are fans of the GOP budget approach as crafted by Rep. Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) and embraced by the party’s presumptive presidential nominee Mitt Romney (Mascaro, 6/20).The New York Times: Distaste For Health Care Law Reflects Spending On AdsLosse is precisely the kind of person President Obama’s signature health care law is intended to help. She has no health insurance. She relies on her mother to buy her a yearly checkup as a Christmas gift, and she pays out of her own pocket for the rest of her medical care, including $1,250 for a recent ultrasound (Goodnough, 6/20).The Associated Press/Washington Post: Conservative Women’s Group Launches $6 Million Ad Campaign Criticizing Health Care LawA conservative women’s group on Wednesday launched a $6 million ad campaign in presidential battleground states criticizing President Barack Obama’s health care reform law. The 60-second ad from Concerned Women for America features a family physician, Ami Siems, warning that patients may be denied care under the new law and might not be able to choose their own doctor (6/20).USA Today: Catholic Bishops Press Cause Against Federal MandatesThe campaign kicks off Thursday. Government, they say, should not decide who is religious enough to be exempt from government mandates — particularly a requirement to provide free contraception insurance coverage — that would force the faithful to violate church doctrine (Grossman, 6/21).Politico: House Extends FDA User FeesThe House easily passed a bill reauthorizing the FDA’s user fees Wednesday, sending it to the Senate for final approval. The measure passed by voice vote. The exact timing for Senate action on the bill is not yet clear, but that chamber is expected to take it up next week and send it to President Barack Obama (Norman, 6/20).Reuters/Chicago Tribune: Analysis: Hospitals Find A Few Defenders On Wall StreetSuch construction plans are just one example of how publicly traded U.S. hospital chains are preparing for a new era in healthcare. In many cases, operators like Community Health and Health Management Associates Inc are becoming turnaround strategists, taking over struggling nonprofit community hospitals for bargain prices and investing in new technology for the promise of a new revenue stream (6/21).The Wall Street Journal: J& J Close To Settling Off-Label ProbesJohnson & Johnson and the Justice Department are close to settling a protracted investigation into the company’s promotion of the antipsychotic Risperdal, for what would be one of the highest sums to date in a drug-marketing case, according to people familiar with the matter. The sides are trying to wrap together a number of lawsuits, state investigations and other probes of alleged illegal marketing, and are discussing a payment of at least $1.5 billion, some of the people said (Rockoff and Lublin, 6/20).The Associated Press/Washington Post: Cuba Defends Its Banks After US Prosecutors Say Medicare Fraud Money Sent To Island AccountsA Cuban official said Wednesday that the country has strict controls to avoid money laundering and works closely with banks to detect and deter fraudulent transactions, responding to allegations by U.S. prosecutors that millions of dollars defrauded from Medicare were routed to the island’s financial system (6/20).The Associated Press/Washington Post: Florida Gov. Scott Says His State Will Carry Out Obama’s Health Law If Supreme Court UpholdsFlorida’s Republican governor — one of the staunchest opponents of President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul — says his state will carry out the law if the Supreme Court upholds it. Gov. Rick Scott told reporters Wednesday “if it is the law of the land, then we are going to comply.” The highly anticipated ruling is expected before the end of next week (6/20).The New York Times: Albany Bill On Organ Donation Urges License Applicants To ActThe New York State Legislature passed a measure on Wednesday aimed at increasing the low number of organ donors in the state by encouraging driver’s license applicants to make an active choice about their donation status. If the bill is signed by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, New York will become the second state, along with California, to make such a change in its donor registration process (Sack, 6/20).The Associated Press/Chicago Tribune: 11 Illinois Health Centers Win $6.5 Million In Federal Awards To Expand Care To More PatientsEleven health centers in Illinois have been awarded grants under the Affordable Care Act to expand care. The Illinois grants announced Wednesday total nearly $6.5 million. U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius (seh-BEEL’-yuhs) announced more than $128 million in awards to health centers in 41 states (6/20).Check out all of Kaiser Health News’ e-mail options including First Edition and Breaking News alerts on our Subscriptions page. This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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Under Health Law States Serve As Testing Grounds For Innovation

first_imgMedia outlets report on a range of issues related to the measure’s implementation, including how some states are finding opportunities in the overhaul to pursue their own health system changes. Also in the news, the latest on the roles being played by emergency rooms, faith-based non-profits and accountable care organizations.     The Wall Street Journal: Some States See In The Health Law A Chance To Pursue Unique SolutionsThe federal health-care law was intended to create a uniform standard of health coverage across the U.S. But the law also is creating opportunities for states to pursue their own solutions. For states like Vermont, that means pursuing liberal experiments that go further than the Affordable Care Act; for others, it means expanding coverage for the poor in a way that’s more palatable to conservative lawmakers (Radnofsky, 6/8).Louisville Courier Journal/USA Today: More Patients Flocking To ERs Under ObamacareIt wasn’t supposed to work this way, but since the Affordable Care Act took effect in January, Norton Hospital has seen its packed emergency room become even more crowded, with about 100 more patients a month. … Nationally, nearly half of ER doctors responding to a recent poll by the American College of Emergency Physicians said they’ve seen more visits since Jan. 1, and nearly nine in 10 expect those visits to rise in the next three years. Mike Rust, president of the Kentucky Hospital Association, said members statewide describe the same trend. Experts cite many reasons (Ungar, 6/8).The Washington Post: Opponents Of Health-Care Law Turn To Faith-Based Non-Profits to Cover Medical ExpensesSusan Tucker is one of millions of Americans who dislike the health law and want nothing to do with it. But the 54-year-old Venice, Fla., homemaker took her opposition a step further: She opted out. Tucker dropped the private health plan she had carried for more than a decade and joined Christian Healthcare Ministries, a faith-based nonprofit in which members pool their money to pay for one another’s medical needs — and promise to adhere to biblical values, such as attending church and abstaining from sex outside marriage (Somashekhar, 6/5).Los Angeles Times: Anthem, HealthCare Partners Save $4.7 Million By Coordinating Care Insurance giant Anthem Blue Cross and the HealthCare Partners physician group say a new effort to coordinate care among 55,000 patients helped save $4.7 million. In results released Friday, the two companies said their collaboration, known as an accountable-care organization, or ACO, cut costs by reducing hospital admissions, emergency-room visits and lab tests, particularly among patients with chronic conditions (Terhune, 6/6).Meanwhile, the ACA’s discount drug program faces a legal challenge –  The New York Times: Judge Voids Expansion Of Discount Drug ProgramA federal judge has struck down a new rule requiring drug companies to offer certain drugs at discounted prices, saying the Obama administration had no authority to issue the rule. Federal officials said the decision could provide a windfall to drug makers. However, the pharmaceutical industry said that the administration was stretching the Affordable Care Act to provide discounts on more drugs for more people, and that the rule was “inconsistent with the plain language of the statute” (Pear, 6/8). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Under Health Law, States Serve As Testing Grounds For Innovationlast_img read more

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Republicans In Search Of Revenue May Target Orphan Drug Tax Break

first_imgRepublicans, In Search Of Revenue, May Target Orphan Drug Tax Break The tax credit is part of a popular plan to encourage the development of drugs for rare disease. But ending it could save the government an estimated $54 billion over the next decade Pharma has had a rocky relationship with President Trump since inauguration, but the two agree on at least one thing: Corporate taxes are too high. And yet the nation’s biggest drug makers aren’t paying anywhere near the top corporate tax rate Trump, and congressional Republicans, hope to slash. (Garde, 11/8) A decades-old tax credit designed to spur cures for rare diseases has been so successful that it’s now become a target in the House Republican tax plan. The proposal under consideration would end the tax breaks for development of what are called orphan drugs. Ending the credit used by big and small drug companies could save the government an estimated $54 billion over the next decade, an effort to help offset some of the anticipated losses in revenue if other Republican tax cut provisions become law. (Thomas and Kaplan, 11/8) The New York Times: Congress Weighs Repeal Of Tax Credit For Rare Disease Drugs This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Suzanne Hollack tried to care for her husband at home after he was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia at age 69. But it got to the point where she couldn’t take a shower for fear he would stray out of the house. So 18 months ago, she moved him to a memory care community near their home in Scottsdale, Az., which like most long-term care, is not covered by Medicare. That, plus his other medical expenses, cost the couple $90,000 last year. (Zernike and Goodnough, 11/8) The New York Times: Ending Medical Tax Break Could Be A ‘Gut Punch’ To The Middle Class In other news on the GOP tax overhaul — Stat: Trump Wants To Cut Big Pharma’s Tax Bill, But What Are Drug Makers Actually Paying? last_img read more

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Move over millennials — baby boomers are the ultimate untapped market

first_img Baby boomers are healthy and active with money to spend. Canadian households aged 65 and over had an average net worth of $845,600 in 2016.Getty Images/iStockphoto Comment April 2, 20194:00 PM EDTLast UpdatedApril 3, 20198:23 AM EDT Filed under News Retail & Marketing Ellen Samek Jae C. Hong/AP Photo 2 Comments While businesses have been busy marketing their products and services to millennials, a new report from Environics Analytics says that they are missing out on a huge, mostly untapped market: the baby boomers.Boomers outnumber any other generation in Canada. The number of Canadians over age 55 increased by 87 per cent between 1996 and 2006, according to an Environics report. In the next ten years, there will be another 16 per cent surge in the number of people aged 55 and over. In comparison, Canadians aged between 16 and 54 only rose 14 per cent between 1996 and 2016.Canadian households aged 65 and over had an average net worth of $845,600 in 2016. That’s an 86 per cent increase since 1999 after adjusting for inflation. Why women shouldn’t let a solo retirement catch them by surprise Whistler condo prices soar over 26 per cent as baby boomers snap up winter getaway properties For baby boomer couples, synchronize or stagger is the new retirement dilemma “They’re active, healthy, they have money to spend, they’re interested, and they’re curious,” said Dr Doug Norris, senior vice-president and chief demographer at Environics Analytics. “I don’t think many businesses have tapped into exactly how different they are.”Not only do boomers have the physical numbers and have high life expectancy, they also have the spending power.With all this extra money, good health, and spare time, why aren’t more companies trying to draw the boomers in?Sylvain Charlebois, a professor of food distribution and policy at Dalhousie University thinks it’s because boomers tend to follow the status quo and millennials are largely challenging it, especially when it comes to food.“It’s not really about brands anymore, it’s about the product and what it represents,” said the Guelph-based Charlebois. “Boomers really got into the branding and really enjoyed them. They made a lot of multinationals very successful. Millennials consume very differently, they don’t care about the brand, and they care about what the product represents.”While boomers continue to go to Walmart and Costco, millennials want Whole Foods and the convenience of ready-to-cook meals such as Hello Fresh, said Charlebois.Norris believes boomers are being underestimated and not properly differentiated from the pre-war generations that were more resistant to innovation and technology. Other opportunities within the boomers market includes real estate, as many boomers may be selling their homes in exchange for condos or renovating their current homes for accessibility purposes.There’s also the cannabis industry. Of the 200,000 Canadians with a medical cannabis licence, two-thirds use the substance to treat arthritis. A survey by CAMH Monitor also found there has been a notable rise in cannabis use among those aged 50 and older.A group of seniors at a cannabis dispensary in California. Facebook Move over, millennials — baby boomers are the ultimate untapped market ‘They’re active, healthy, they have money to spend, they’re interested and they’re curious.’ So why aren’t more companies trying to draw them in? Join the conversation → Emailcenter_img How baby boomers will blunt the next recession Share this storyMove over, millennials — baby boomers are the ultimate untapped market Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Retiring baby boomers will trigger a huge wave of business transfers over next 5 to 10 years: CFIB ‘I’ve seen people cleaned out’: Divorce later in life comes with its own special set of problems Environics’ Norris also notes that boomers are more educated than generations before them with half of Canadians 55 and over having some form of post-secondary education and are more interested in innovation. Two industries Norris thinks have been successful in identifying boomers as a viable market are the health and travel industry. “Certainly industries that have been working hard are the travel industry, you think of what’s happening with cruises today, you just can’t build those ships fast enough,” Norris said.A study conducted for Expedia Group Media Solutions by Northstar Research Partners found that out of all generations in Canada, baby boomers travel the most on average with approximately 28 days of travelling per year, with a strong preference for international trips.Cosmetics and beauty are also successfully tapping into the senior market by showcasing older women as spokespeople, Norris said. Some examples include actresses Helen Mirren and Diane Keaton.The report poses the need for accessibility and making shopping and products more senior-friendly as the boomers and older seniors continue to age.Charlebois says grocery stores in rural Canada, where the population of seniors is higher, are making more noticeable changes such as seating options within the store for customers to take a rest.Some brands such as Gillette have already created products serving the rising number of caregivers. Nearly one third of seniors are caregivers to an older relative or friend.In approximately 20 years, seniors will make up about one quarter of Canada’s entire population, most of them women.“The stereotype that the older population is set in their ways, not interested in new products, are very price sensitive and unlikely to switch brands must also be rejected, the report concludes. “More advertising needs to be directed at the older population showing them as interested, active and open to change.”• Email: esamek@nationalpost.com Reddit Twitter Related Stories Morelast_img read more

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Hyundai Kona Electric Gets Driven Watch HourLong Video

Hyundai IONIQ Electric Comes Packing Kona Motor To Defend Race Title Source: Electric Vehicle News See Hyundai Kona Electric In Acid Yellow Hyundai Kona Electric Rated By EPA: Range Of 258 Miles An in-depth look into one of the most anticipated fully electric crossovers on the market today.The Hyundai Kona electric is taking the automotive world (where available) by storm. The Kona electric features a 482 kilometer (WLTP) range, paired up with a 150 kW engine, 395Nm of torque and just 7.6 seconds from 0-62mph (0-100km/h) acceleration time. Furthermore, the Korean electric crossover looks fine too. All of that makes it a highly popular item and possibly a high seller for the Korean carmaker. No wonder that SDA Dan decided to give it a thorough test drive.More about the Hyundai Kona Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 24, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News From what you will see in the two videos added below, the Kona comes with a road-trippable battery. It’s fast chargeable, allowing for greater utility value. And finally, with a leasing option that will put some other car brands to shame, the Hyundai Kona makes a compelling argument for a switch to the EV world.The test drive you can see below features a bright orange Hyundai Kona with black interior. Unlike some previous Hyundais, the Kona seems rather profoundly designed both in and outside. While we cannot judge the feel of the materials used for the interior and the squeakiness of its plastic, the Kona seems like a well-built vehicle throughout. While when compared to let’s say, a Tesla, the interior looks a bit busy, it still doesn’t look cheap or as an afterthought in almost any area. The driver is also impressed with how the vehicle drives, making the Kona a compelling argument for your new EV purchase.Grab a detailed view at the hour-long pair of videos above and below..embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } read more

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Jaguar Preps To Recover Aluminum From IPACE For SecondLife Use

first_img4 photos .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } The pre-production Jaguar I-PACE prototypes are exploited to the maxJaguar Land Rover is working on improving its aluminum closed-loop strategy – to recover aluminum from end-of-life vehicles and reform it into new high-grade aluminum for new cars.As part of the REALITY project, JLR is testing recovery of aluminum from pre-production Jaguar I-PACE prototypes, so the material would get second-life in a new car.“The process is currently being tested on early, pre-production Jaguar I-PACE prototypes which have had their batteries safely removed. These batteries enter into their own second-life process which Jaguar Land Rover is developing while the scrap from the vehicles is sorted into various materials using high-tech sensors by Axion. Once separated, the aluminium scrap is melted and reformed.” Source: Electric Vehicle News Jaguar news It’s great to see that manufacturers are working to recycle the car as much as possible. Additionally, this opens the way for greater use of aluminum in cars in future models, which need to be lighter to achieve better efficiency.“When operating at full capacity, REALITY is expected to reduce the CO2 impact of production while reducing the amount of virgin aluminium required to produce vehicles. Jaguar Land Rover has already reduced its global vehicle manufacturing operating CO2 by 46 per cent per vehicle and remains committed to an ongoing decarbonisation process.The pioneering project, co-funded by Innovate UK, is helping Jaguar Land Rover extend its closed loop aluminium economy. Between September 2013 and January 2019, around 300,000 tonnes of closed-loop scrap have been processed back into the brand’s lightweight aluminium intensive architecture, across all vehicle lines including XE.In 2014, Jaguar XE was the first vehicle in the world to use aluminium alloy grade RC5754 for its body panels, which contains up to 75 per cent recycled aluminium. Half of the XE body structure is made of aluminium alloy grades that contain an important amount of recycled aluminium content – made possible by a closed-loop manufacturing system at our UK and Slovakia facilities.As part of an ACES future, there will be an increased opportunity for recycling through the REALITY project, as Jaguar Land Rover will be able to plan for the retirement of large shared fleets. This will enable the company to engineer closed loop recycling into tight production schedules, as the vehicles can be recovered, de-polluted and shredded en masse – making a viable business case for using the company’s recycled aluminium within its own facilities.Jaguar Land Rover currently uses 180,000 tonnes of aluminium per year – a small percentage of the 80 million tonnes produced globally each year. It is already one of the most widely recycled materials with 75 per cent of all aluminium ever produced still in circulation.”“The recycled aluminium is being put through its paces by Brunel University scientists, who have conducted strength tests and graded its purity to ensure it meets the required mechanical standards to be used in body panels right across the Jaguar and Land Rover ranges.”Gaëlle Guillaume, Lead Project Manager, REALITY at Jaguar Land Rover, said:“More than a million cars are crushed every year in the UK and this pioneering project affords us a real opportunity to give some of them a second life. Aluminium is a valuable material and a key component in our manufacturing process and as such we’re committed to ensuring our use of it is as responsible as possible.”center_img Jaguar Land Rover Installs UK’s Largest Work Charging Station Jaguar Ponders Next-Gen F-Type: Electric Or Gasoline? Land Rover Installs World’s Most Remote Charging Point Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 4, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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EGEB 602 MW of Carolina solar Europe put 30 billion into wind

first_imgSource: Charge Forward In today’s EGEB:Duke Energy announces contracts for 602 megawatts of Carolina solar.Europe invested $30 billion in wind projects last year.The Trump administration is trying to steer Puerto Rico away from renewables and toward natural gas. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe the podcast.https://youtu.be/a80dwn_R-mcThe post EGEB: 602 MW of Carolina solar, Europe put $30 billion into wind in 2018, and more appeared first on Electrek.last_img read more

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Company aims to power remote communities worldwide with river hydro system

first_imgA Maine company announced the commercial launch of a renewable river-driven energy system that it hopes will be used to power remote communities around the world — communities which often rely on diesel to generate electricity at extremely high prices. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe the podcast.https://youtu.be/a80dwn_R-mcThe post Company aims to power remote communities worldwide with river hydro system appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img read more

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Reality dawns on Hull as the promoted clubs feel the chill

first_imgnews Topics Reality dawns on Hull as the promoted clubs feel the chill Share on Facebook Louise Taylor This article is more than 10 years old First published on Wed 31 Dec 2008 15.10 EST Share on LinkedIn Share on WhatsApp Share on Messenger Hull City Shares00 Share on Twitter Share via Email Phil Brown looks on during Hull’s 1-0 defeat to Aston Villa. Photograph: Jamie McDonald/Getty Imagescenter_img Share on Pinterest • One win from the last 11 games has ruined Hull’s party• Pulis and Mowbray talk up survival at Stoke and WBA Premier League Stoke City Premier League Share via Email Reuse this content West Bromwich Albion Share on Twitter Phil Brown will be 50 in May but his party plans have been placed on hold until Hull City are safe from relegation. “The one thing I want for my birthday is to remain a Premier League manager,” he admits. “That means everything.” A few weeks ago it seemed Brown could safely have booked a venue for that landmark bash and told his pals to keep the 30th free, but suddenly Hull fans fear spring could be a time for consolation rather than celebration.After just one win in 11 games the early season adrenaline surge which propelled them into the Champions League zone has subsided. Although Hull already boast 27 points, Brown’s decision to berate his players on the pitch at half-time during the 5–1 Boxing Day defeat at Manchester City appeared a dangerous gamble. While such behaviour carries the risk of “losing” a dressing-roomful of rich young men it also smacked of desperation.Undaunted, the likeable, often engagingly exciteable, Brown insists it was all part of a calculated strategy. “Why not conduct a team talk on the pitch?” he retorted. “Why not do it in front of everyone. It wasn’t a knee-jerk reaction. It was definitely the right thing to do. If it meant bruising one or two egos so be it.”It is early days but the creditable nature of Hull’s narrow home defeat by Aston Villa on Tuesday night suggests that Brown – whose failure to remove his walkie-talkie headset before administering that rollicking afforded him an unintentionally comic air – might just have got away with it. Indeed his little piece of public theatre could yet prove a watershed moment, sparking a midwinter revival.Similarly Stoke City must wait to assess the ramifications of their most gifted individual, Ricardo Fuller, being sent off for slapping his own captain, Andy Griffin, during last Sunday’s defeat at West Ham. Such creative tension is perhaps inevitable when hard-won Premier League status comes under threat. While never reaching Hull’s high altitudes, Tony Pulis’s side began the campaign in quietly encouraging fashion but have now gone six league games without victory and have slipped into the relegation zone.Undeterred, Stoke’s chairman, Peter Coates, draws comfort from the tightness of the table. “Any three of 12 could get relegated but Tony will be making at least three new signings during January and I’m still confident we can stay up. We can give any team a good game.”Across the Midlands, another Tony knows new life has been breathed into his West Brom side’s survival challenge courtesy of festive home wins against Manchester City and Tottenham. Like Brown, Tony Mowbray played under Bruce Rioch and became familiar with the former Bolton and Middlesbrough manager’s mantra that “mountains are there for climbing”. While Hull and Stoke have nimbly traversed their way to the halfway point, Mowbray is entitled to wonder if that pair might just lack the necessary nerve and technical ability to scale the tricky rock face now confronting them.”I like my team and believe our quality will start counting,” stressed West Brom’s manager, who has been hampered by a lack of fit strikers and transfer market cash. “We have several teams around us like Middlesbrough, Stoke, Wigan, Bolton, Newcastle and Sunderland visiting the Hawthorns in the second half of the season and we can make things very uncomfortable for those sides.”Paul Duffen, Hull’s chairman, is another man who prefers to see his club’s glass as half full and is happy to sanction a February bonding break in Bahrain where Brown trusts the sunshine will exert a healing effect on squad morale. “I’m sure the teams that are four or five points behind us are looking at Hull and wishing they were in our position,” reflected Duffen. “If we start looking at teams at the bottom we’ll end up down there with them. We’ve just got to keep looking up, have confidence and be courageous and committed.”Confidence is very much the X factor for newly promoted teams struck by mid-season vertigo. Once belief starts evaporating, previously assured performers are suddenly bafflingly betrayed by hitherto trusty first touches.”We’ve had some disappointing results lately and confidence is damaged by defeats,” admitted Michael Turner, the Hull defender. “But although we’ve had a slight setback and haven’t met the challenge of people’s growing expectations we are all in this together. We feel we can definitely start winning again.”The invitations cannot be posted yet but Brown’s friends and family remain poised to party on 30 May. This article is more than 10 years old Share on Facebook Wed 31 Dec 2008 15.10 ESTlast_img read more

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The Panama Papers Origins Of The Parker FCPA Enforcement Action

first_imgThis recent post highlighted the DOJ’s Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action against Lawrence Parker in connection with a telecommunications bribery scheme in Aruba in which the DOJ alleged that Servicio di Telecommunicacion di Aruba N.V. (SETAR) was an instrumentality of the Aruban government such that Egbert Yvan Ferdinand Koolman (a product manager at SETAR and alleged bribe recepient) was a “foreign official.”This post highlights that the likely origin of the FCPA enforcement action against Parker was this March 2017 civil complaint filed in U.S. court by SETAR against Koolman, Parker and several other entities and individuals and how the civil complaint originated with the so-called Panama Papers.In summary fashion, SETAR’s complaint alleges:“This case arises from Egbert Yvan Ferdinand Koolman’s orchestration, oversight and direction of a more than decade-long scheme of anti-competitive and racketeering activity. At all relevant times, his and others’ objective was the theft of more than $15 million from Setar  N.V. through a scheme of illegal kickbacks and improperly obtained compensation, revenues and profits on mobile phone equipment purchase contracts run through a web of secretly related companies.Each of the Defendants needed, and in fact depended on, the participation of the others to accomplish their common purpose of fraud and deceit for financial gain. Prior to being terminated for cause in August 2016, Koolman was in charge of procurement of cellular phones and other mobile equipment for Setar – a privatized full telecommunications service provider for the island of Aruba. The other Defendants were either Setar’s suppliers or principals of Setar’s suppliers from at least 2005 through 2016. During that more than ten-year period, Koolman repeatedly and systematically abused his position with Setar by manipulating the procurement process to steer business to his co-conspirators, who would reward Koolman and others with millions of dollars in kickbacks, and who themselves were awarded millions of dollars in illgotten purchase contracts on mobile phone equipment. The Defendants’ illicit scheme of kickbacks, commercial bribery, bid-rigging and price-fixing was anti-competitive, and it was a quintessentially symbiotic illegal racketeering enterprise. All told, their individual and collective misconduct over a more than ten year period cost Setar tens of millions of dollars.”Under the heading “The Panama Papers and Koolman’s Dismissal from Setar,” the complaint alleges:“After the Panama Papers became public in 2015, Setar’s Board and Director independently learned that a “Koolman” who had been linked in the Panama Papers to Defendant 3DK Consulting Corp was, in fact, the same Koolman that Setar employed as its Product Manager. In a subsequent meeting with Setar representatives on May 3, 2016, Koolman finally admitted to his involvement with 3DK, but his admission was limited and highly misleading. Koolman admitted to Setar representatives that he had established 3DK with an unnamed business partner, but he also told them the company had been inactive for the past three (3) years and never got as far as opening a business bank account. In Koolman’s words, 3DK “never got off the ground.”Importantly, this was the first instance in which Koolman had ever mentioned anything to Setar about 3DK, despite the fact that 3DK had existed for roughly a decade and apparently with little regard for the obvious conflicts of interest it presented for his continued employment with Setar. More importantly, Koolman’s disclosure was a lie.”The DOJ’s FCPA enforcement against Parker does not specifically identify his companies, but SETAR’s complaint alleges that the following companies are connected to Parker:ITech Solutions Group, IncISky Wireless Group LLCPacific Technologies, LLCQuantum Wireless Technologies, LLCI-GSM Group LLCFor previous reporting on SETAR’s compliant see here and here. Save Money With FCPA Connect Keep it simple. Not all FCPA issues warrant a team of lawyers or other professional advisers. Achieve client and business objectives in a more efficient manner through FCPA Connect. Candid, Comprehensive, and Cost-Effective. Connectlast_img read more

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Friday Roundup

first_img FCPA Institute – Boston (Oct. 3-4) A unique two-day learning experience ideal for a diverse group of professionals seeking to elevate their FCPA knowledge and practical skills through active learning. Learn more, spend less. CLE credit is available. Learn More & Register Scrutiny alert, coincidence or FCPA-related, ripple dismissed, and more shallow commentary, and ISO 37001 laughable.  It’s all here in the Friday roundup.Scrutiny AlertAs highlighted in this previous post, in late 2013/early 2014 United Technologies Corp. (UTC) disclosed FCPA scrutiny concerning a non-employee sales representative retained in China. Recently, the company disclosed: “On March 7, 2018, the DOJ notified UTC that it had decided to close its investigation of this matter. Based on our ongoing discussions with the SEC staff to resolve this matter, UTC recorded a charge of approximately $11 million in the second quarter of 2018.”Coincidence or FCPA-RelatedThis previous post highlighted a number of country exits after a company was under FCPA scrutiny or resolved an FCPA enforcement action.Add another company to the list. As highlighted here, in June 2017 World Acceptance Corporation (a South Carolina based consumer finance company) operating in 15 U.S. states and Mexico disclosed FCPA scrutiny in Mexico.Recently, the company disclosed that it “entered into an agreement to sell our Mexico operations and intend[s] to complete the sale by July 27th.” In connection with the transaction, the company recognized a $31.3 million loss and upon this disclose its stock price fell 7%.Call this a ripple of FCPA scrutiny.Ripple DismissedSpeaking of ripples, the most frequent forms of civil litigation in the aftermath of FCPA scrutiny or enforcement are securities fraud class actions or derivative actions. A high percentage of these actions are dismissed at the motion to dismiss stage.Another ripple of FCPA scrutiny or enforcement, while less frequent than the above actions, are civil claims under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) in which participants in a company’s investment program  allege breach of fiduciary duty and other duties such as prudence, loyalty, and monitoring against program managers.In the aftermath of its FCPA enforcement (see here and here for the prior post), General Cable was hit with such a civil claim. In summary fashion:“Plaintiff contends that defendants permitted the Plan to continue to offer General Cable stock as an investment option even after defendants knew or should have known that the stock was artificially inflated because the company had not disclosed that employees of its foreign subsidiaries had violated the [FCPA] by paying bribes to foreign government officials. Plaintiff alleges that the stock was thus an imprudent investment, and defendants breached their duties of prudence and loyalty in offering the stock to Plan participants.”Recently, a federal court dismissed the action.More Shallow CommentaryThis recent highlighted shallow FCPA commentary – that is commentary that lacks an appreciation of context and perspective.On this score, wow is this FCPA Blog guest post bad.Regarding the points asserted in the post:How did the DOJ “halt its prosecution of Credit Suisse HK” or “terminate” it? The company agreed to resolve its FCPA scrutiny via a non-prosecution agreement – a form of resolution that existed long before the Trump administration.FCPA settlement amounts are not determined on the basis of whether a company is foreign or domestic. Settlement amounts are determined largely on the basis of the net financial benefit obtained through a bribery scheme as well as how the company acted in response to the conduct at issue (i.e. voluntary disclosure, cooperation, etc.) These factors help explain why many of the largest FCPA settlements have been against foreign companies. (See here for more).Moreover, in many years (long before the Trump administration) much of the largeness of FCPA enforcement was because of enforcement actions against foreign companies. (See here for more).Commenting on the FCPA Blog post, an individual on social media observed: “That is a horrendous article. Does FCPA Blog review the stuff they post?”I agree. It would be nice if the FCPA Blog did exercise some editorial oversight over things published on its site.ISO 37001 LaughableI remain open-minded about the efficacy of ISO 37001 certification and am willing to be persuaded that it is a good idea. However, every time I read or listen to commentary by ISO 37001 cheerleaders (you know people marketing and selling their ISO 37001 services) I find myself not being persuaded (see here for a recent post).This podcast is laughable for so many reasons not ISO 37001 specific. As to the ISO 37001 issues, I get that the person marketing and selling her ISO 37001 services is “excited” – a word used several times in the podcast – but I remain unpersuaded that ISO 37001 is a good idea for U.S. companies.last_img read more

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Get Ready To Share Your Story And Preview the New ChangingAging

first_imgby, Kavan Peterson, Editor, ChangingAging.orgTweet4Share4Share1Email9 SharesI know I said we would be revealing our new design this week but as you can imagine we’re still working out some bugs and it’s not quite ready to launch. It’s also been an extremely busy week with the big Erickson School Look Who’s Aging conference in Florida so we’ve been very tied up.However, we’re eager to start accepting submissions from our readers so we’ve posted our new Submissions page and here is a sneak preview of the new ChangingAging homepage:ChangingAging-Redesign-Theme-HomepageThis is NOT the final product, just a preview of the new theme with some placeholders for the header and features gallery. But you can see we’re going for a cleaner, warmer look that will focus much more on content.Speaking of which, we’re very excited to begin hearing from our readers and featuring your stories. ChangingAging has a relatively small, niche audience that shares our unique pro-aging view so it is critical that we hear from you so we can populate our site with your stories.When you look around at the kind of content other aging-focused sites produce you see an overwhelming emphasis on the negative aspects of aging and complete domination by the “Anti-Aging” industry and view point. We need our audience to share your stories reflecting the counter viewpoint to the Anti-Aging industry — we need your pro-aging stories.So here’s the intro to our Submissions guidelines and a link to the page:At ChangingAging™ we believe there is potential for growth and development no matter your age or condition, so we’re always looking for stories, videos and photos from people celebrating the aging experience. We welcome people of all ages and backgrounds to submit questions about aging or caregiving, personal stories or guest blogposts, especially if it helps shed light on what comes after adulthood.WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FORJOURNEYS: We need your stories to change aging. What’s it really like getting old? We welcome stories from people of all ages (we are all growing!) but in particular from those who are exploring the uncharted waters of “Not-Adulthood”. Do we have any Crones reading this? Any Sages? We need to hear from you.QUESTIONS: The most common questions we get are about aging and caregiving. No audience knows more about these topics than ours. Let our community answer your questions.INNOVATIONS: How is technology, science, culture, art and philosophy changing the way we age and take care of each other? We’re interested in everything from the latest gadgets to breakthrough trends in caregiving.PHOTOS: What does Senescence look like? Send us your pictures.VIDEOS: Show us your stories and send us good links from the YouTubes.WHAT NOT TO SUBMITAnti-Aging products, pills, quackery or snakeoil.No fad dieting, vitamins or rejuvenation tips either. Eating healthy and exercising is called common sense, so you better have something new to say about it.Strictly self-promoting content or sales pitches.Copyrighted material (owned by other than yourself).Continue reading here for our submission rules and a link to send us your stories.We’re also launching a Flickr Gallery here and invite our readers to share photos in our gallery.Related PostsYour Stories Your Questions Your AnswersThis week ChangingAging debuted an updated homepage and we will begin launching — with your help — some major new features designed to put you and your stories at the cChangingAging Blogstream UpdatesFor nearly two months we’ve been working behind the scenes at ChangingAging developing a complete rebuild and redesign of the website. We will soon be rolling out more visible changes so it’s now time to give you, our valued ChangingAging community, a heads up so we don’t freak you out…Grateful Changemakers: ChangingAgingAll of ChangingAging’s performances, all of our advocacy, all of our innovation is driven at its core by love. Love is the driving force behind combating ageism.Tweet4Share4Share1Email9 SharesTags: Aging Longevitylast_img read more

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Study sheds light on how good bacteria prevent gut inflammation

first_imgBy Sally Robertson, B.Sc.Jul 4 2018Researchers at the Baylor College of Medicine have identified the mechanism by which good bacteria (microbiota) help maintain a healthy intestine.Image Credit: paulista / ShutterstockThe study, which was recently published in the journal Immunity, shows that the microbiota balance intestinal immune responses and protect against inflammation through their interaction with epithelial cells and immune cells.The findings suggest that manipulating these good bacteria to minimize the immune responses could benefit individuals with conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.Related StoriesStudy: Surveillance for antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues to be core focus for healthcare facilitiesGrowth problems in preterm infants associated with altered gut bacteriaStructure of bacteria responsible for traveler’s diarrhea decipheredStudy author Gretchen Diehl says microbes such as salmonella prompt a strong inflammatory immune response that is designed to eliminate the microbe, but that this response can also damage healthy tissue.Microbiota help tone down this response by triggering antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to release the cytokine IL-10, which regulates T cell responses to prevent inflammation occurring.The result, says Diehl, is a balanced response that still can fight off an infection like Salmonella, but that is regulated to prevent damage to the healthy intestinal tissue. Source:https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-07/bcom-hgb070318.php Here we defined a role for the microbiota in modulating the immune response in a way that reduces inflammation and limits the damage it can do to the gut.”Gretchen Diehl, Study Author To find out how the microbiota trigger this response, Diehl and colleagues investigated what happens when they administer antibiotics to laboratory animals. The team found that among animals given the antibiotics, APCs failed to produce IL-10.The researchers transferred the bacteria back into the animals’ intestines and found that only the bacteria that were able to interact with the intestinal epithelial cells could trigger antigen-presenting cells to produce IL-10.center_img The researchers will now explore the signaling pathways that become activated once bacteria attach to the epithelium, in the hope of identifying new pathways that can be manipulated to balance the immune response. It’s somewhat counterintuitive because microbes that can attach to the intestinal epithelium are thought of as pathogens that can potentially cause disease.But in this case, we found that the attachment of bacteria to the epithelium was not causing disease; on the contrary, it was necessary to promote a balanced regulation of the T cell responses and helped protect the gut.”Gretchen Diehl, Study Authorlast_img read more

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New findings suggest opportunity to focus on safe opioid use and disposal

first_img Source:http://www.med.umich.edu Jul 30 2018Nearly a third of older adults have received a prescription for an opioid pain medicine in the past two years, but many of them didn’t get enough counseling about the risks that come with the potent painkillers, how to reduce their use, when to switch to a non-opioid option, or what to do with leftover pills, a new poll finds.But the poll also finds that nearly three-quarters of older adults would support limits on how many opioid pills a doctor could prescribe at once. Even more supported other efforts to limit exposure to these medications, and potentially combat the national epidemic of opioid misuse due to medication diversion.The new findings, from the National Poll on Healthy Aging, suggest a major opportunity for providers and community organizations to focus on safe opioid use and safe disposal among older Americans. These findings also could help state and federal policymakers understand the views of a key demographic group at a critical time.The poll of 2,013 adults between the ages of 50 and 80 was conducted by the University of Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, and sponsored by AARP and Michigan Medicine, U-M’s academic medical center.”We know that unused opioid medications that linger in homes are one of the primary pathways to diversion, misuse, abuse, and dependence. As prescribers, we must find opportunities to discuss safe opioid use, storage, and disposal with our patients,” says Jennifer Waljee, M.D., M.P.H., M.S., the co-director of the Michigan Opioid Prescribing Engagement Network (Michigan OPEN) and an associate professor of surgery at Michigan Medicine. “It is critically important to provide a detailed plan for patients who get opioids for pain management and resources for disposal.”Waljee worked with NPHA director and U-M professor Preeti Malani, M.D., and IHPI National Clinician Scholar Calista Harbaugh, M.D., to design the poll.They focused not only on older adults’ own opioid use but also their storage and disposal habits, as well as their perceptions of recent policy measures around opioid prescribing.Common prescribing, inadequate counselingMost of the 589 older adults who said they’d received an opioid prescription in the previous two years said it related to arthritis pain, back pain, surgery and/or an injury. While the majority remembered their doctor, pharmacist or other health care provider talking with them about how often to take the medication, the percentage who said they’d talked with any provider about other opioid issues was much lower.For instance, less than half said their doctor or other provider had counseled them about the risk of addiction or overdose. Just over a quarter said their pharmacist had provided counseling. Slightly more individuals reported that doctors and pharmacists discussed options to reduce the amount of opioids they were taking.Only 37 percent said their doctor had talked with them about what to do with leftover opioid pills, while 25 percent said their pharmacist had done so. Half of those who had been prescribed an opioid said they had had pills left over, and 86 percent said they kept them for later potential use.”The fact that so many older adults report having leftover opioid pills is a big problem, given the risk of abuse and addiction with these medications,” says Alison Bryant, Ph.D., senior vice president of research for AARP. “Having unused opioids in the house, often stored in unlocked medicine cabinets, is a big risk to other family members as well. These findings highlight the importance of improving older adults’ awareness and access to services that will help them safely dispose of unused opioid medications.”Disposal vs. keeping unused pillsRelated StoriesBariatric surgery should be offered to all patients who would benefitBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgerySleep disorders in patients with low back pain linked to increased healthcare visits, costsThe poll also asked those who didn’t have leftover medication, and those who had not been prescribed an opioid in the past two years, what they would have done with leftover pain pills. Two-thirds said they would save them for future use, 27 percent said they would dispose of them at home, and 36 percent said they would take them to an approved disposal facility.Disposing of leftover medications may require travel to a facility such as a police station, authorized pharmacy, or community “takeback” event that can sometimes be logistically difficult for patients.The poll asked all respondents to think about what they would do if there were a safe-disposal product that they could pick up along with their prescription. Such products are already on the market and include powders that can be poured into the bottle with extra pills, mixed with water, and safely disposed of in the trash. In all, 39 percent said they would definitely use it, but the majority of the rest said they’d save the medication for future use. And if the safe-disposal product cost $5 or $10, only 9 percent said they would be very likely to buy it.Opioid policy opinionsThe researchers suspect that older adults may fear that they will not be able to obtain pain medications when needed as new state opioid-related policies and laws target reduced prescribing.Current and proposed laws in some states require providers to look at patients’ prescription records before prescribing opioids, and some require patients to tell their provider if they have been taking pain medications. Other states have proposed special provider education, prescribing restrictions, and required return of unused medications.The poll shows that nearly all older adults support policies such as required review of prescription records and disclosure of prior opioid medication use, despite concerns that these policies may be perceived as invading patients’ privacy. A slightly lower percentage supported requiring providers to get special training before they can prescribe opioids. But the poll team was surprised to find that 74 percent supported restrictions on the number of opioid pills, or the number of days’ supply, for which prescribers could write a single prescription. On the other hand, just under half of older adults said they’d support required return of unused medications.Taken together, Malani says, the poll results suggest that healthcare providers who prescribe or dispense opioids should do more to help patients understand how to safely use and dispose of them, in language that patients understand. This should include a disposal plan that helps patients understand why they should dispose of extra medications, and how best to do so.”When a patient is prescribed an opioid, there are often many other aspects of care at the forefront of patient’s minds, such as their diagnosis, social stressors, work-related concerns, and caring for loved ones, and it can result in education fatigue,” says Waljee. “But we spend a lot of time educating our patients on when they can drive, return to work, and take care of their painful condition or surgical incision sites. Similarly, we need to educate our patients on what to expect following pain, the role and risks of opioids, and important alternatives such as over-the-counter analgesics, breathing, exercise, and sleep.”The poll results are based on answers from a nationally representative sample of 2,013 people ages 50 to 80. The poll respondents answered a wide range of questions online. Questions were written, and data interpreted and compiled, by the IHPI team. Laptops and Internet access were provided to poll respondents who did not already have it.last_img read more

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Sleeping six to eight hours a night is most beneficial for heart

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 27 2018Researchers have found a sweet spot of six to eight hours sleep a night is most beneficial for heart health. More or less is detrimental. Their findings are presented today at ESC Congress 2018.Study author Dr Epameinondas Fountas, of the Onassis Cardiac Surgery Centre, Athens, Greece, said: “We spend one-third of our lives sleeping yet we know little about the impact of this biological need on the cardiovascular system.”The study investigated the relationship between sleep duration and cardiovascular disease using a meta-analysis, a statistical tool for combining the results of previous studies on the same topic. The meta-analysis included 11 prospective studies of more than one million adults (1,000,541) without cardiovascular disease published within the last five years.Related StoriesSleep quality and fatigue among women with premature ovarian insufficiencySleep quality could be indicator for later Alzheimer’s disease finds studySleep decline in one’s 50s, 60s increases risk of Alzheimer’s diseaseTwo groups, one with short (less than six hours) and another with long (more than eight hours) nightly sleep duration, were compared to the reference group (six to eight hours).The researchers found that both short and long sleepers had a greater risk of developing or dying from coronary artery disease or stroke. Compared to adults who slept six to eight hours a night, short and long sleepers had 11% and 33% greater risks, respectively, of developing or dying from coronary artery disease or stroke during an average follow-up of 9.3 years.Dr Fountas said: “Our findings suggest that too much or too little sleep may be bad for the heart. More research is needed to clarify exactly why, but we do know that sleep influences biological processes like glucose metabolism, blood pressure, and inflammation – all of which have an impact on cardiovascular disease.”A strength of the current analysis is that only prospective studies were included, noted Dr Fountas. This avoids recall bias, a source of systematic error in statistics arising from the inability of participants to accurately recall information.Dr Fountas concluded: “Having the odd short night or lie-in is unlikely to be detrimental to health, but evidence is accumulating that prolonged nightly sleep deprivation or excessive sleeping should be avoided. The good news is that there are plenty of ways to get into the habit of getting six to eight hours a night – for example by going to bed and getting up at the same time every day, avoiding alcohol and caffeine before bed, eating healthily, and being physically active. Getting the right amount of sleep is an important part of a healthy lifestyle.” Source:https://www.escardio.org/The-ESC/Press-Office/Press-releases/Finding-the-sweet-spot-of-a-good-night-s-sleep-not-too-long-and-not-too-shortlast_img read more

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Top stories A fourlegged snake ordinary microbes in an extraordinary place and

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Mysterious link emerges between Native Americans and people half a globe awayThe Americas were the last great frontier to be settled by humans, and their peopling remains one of the great mysteries for researchers. Now, scientists are facing a new mystery: Modern Native Americans have traces of DNA related to that of native people from Australia and Melanesia. The finding opens a window on the ancestors of today’s Native Americans as they sat poised to enter the New World.How Pluto’s most spectacular image was made—and nearly lost Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Our behind-the-scenes account of all of the computer work that went into last week’s spectacular Pluto image. Among the revelations: Scientists could not email data files (they had to use thumb drives because of a fear of a leak), several researchers pulled an all-nighter just to get the image ready for the public, and the image file itself was nearly lost.Internet tycoon takes search for extraterrestrial intelligence to the next levelThe search for extraterrestrial intelligence just got a huge boost. Russian Internet entrepreneur Yuri Milner will devote $100 million to a 10-year effort to detect signals from other technological civilizations in the universe. The project is slated to be the most comprehensive search, and would be faster, more sensitive, and cover the broadest swath of the electromagnetic spectrum than ever before.’It’s like going to Pluto and seeing McDonald’s’Researchers have obtained the first samples of microorganisms from sediments more than 2 kilometers below the ocean floor—only to discover they are surprisingly ordinary. You would think that the heat, pressure, and the short supply of food in these depths would house weird and undiscovered organisms. But researchers found that the microorganism’s cells are similar to microbes that live in a less demanding habitat on land: the soils in forests.Four-legged snake fossil stuns scientists—and ignites controversyScientists have uncovered the first known fossil of a four-legged snake. The 120-or-so-million-year-old creature was about 20 centimeters (8 inches) long and had 5 little “toes” at the end of its limbs. Although it’s pretty snakelike, some researchers aren’t so sure it belongs in the snake family tree. Eye drops could dissolve cataractsCataracts cloud the eyes of tens of millions of people around the world and nearly 17.2% of Americans over the age of 40. Currently, the only treatment is surgery. But now, a team of scientists and ophthalmologists has tested a solution in dogs that may be able to dissolve the cataract right out of the eye’s lens. And the solution is itself a solution: a steroid-based eye drop.last_img read more

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Cosmic rays help give Jupiters Great Red Spot its color

first_imgA persistent whirling feature in Jupiter’s atmosphere large enough to swallow Earth, aptly dubbed the Great Red Spot (upper right, above), may get some of its namesake color from sulfur compounds generated when cosmic rays and ultraviolet light zap a common substance in the planet’s clouds, new research suggests. That little-studied compound, ammonium hydrosulfide (NH4SH), is typically a clear and colorless solid, and at the conditions prevalent high in the jovian atmosphere it would either form the core of ice grains or a frosty coating on other particles. New lab tests show that when NH4SH is bombarded with high-energy cosmic rays—in this study, protons accelerated to about 14,000 kilometers per second—it breaks down into several varieties of chemical shrapnel, including negatively charged ions of S3 and S6. UV light irradiating the substance probably generates the same breakdown products, the researchers suggest. A detailed analysis of the lab-zapped substance reveals that the mixture strongly absorbs blue, violet, and near-UV wavelengths of light (300 to 500 nanometers), leaving relatively higher proportions of wavelengths from the center and red end of the visible spectrum in the light that’s reflected, the researchers report online and in a forthcoming Icarus. Because the absorption spectrum measured in the lab doesn’t exactly match that observed by the Hubble Space Telescope and other instruments, the light-absorbing characteristics of other atmospheric constituents such as methane may help contribute to the perceived color of the Great Red Spot. Future tests that also include other common jovian gases may help better recreate the distribution of wavelengths astronomers actually observe, the researchers say.last_img read more

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Scientists nail the coolest course for marathoners at the 2020 Olympics

first_img By Shandria SuttonAug. 2, 2018 , 3:35 PM Kimimasa Mayama/REUTERS Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Scientists nail the coolest course for marathoners at the 2020 Olympics Email Staying on the cooler side of the course could reduce the warmth experienced by runners as much as 8°C, the researchers estimate. The same methods, they note, could also be used to study the potential heat risks posed by other Olympic events that will be held outdoors, like track and field and beach volleyball. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo are still years away, but scientists already have some advice for marathon runners who will be running for the gold: Stay right if you want to stay cool.The games will be held in August, the hottest time of the year, so heat could pose a major threat to athletes—especially marathoners, who face a higher risk of heat stroke than most competitors. To help reduce that risk, researchers used existing temperature and humidity data to forecast thermal conditions along the expected marathon course in Tokyo, as well as how shadows from adjacent buildings might fall across the 42-kilometer route.The modeling indicates that runners will stay slightly cooler if they stick to the right side of the course on the outgoing leg, and the left side when returning, the researchers report this month in the International Journal of Biometeorology. The study suggests temperatures could be 26°C to 28°C when the race starts and climb gradually over the next few hours.last_img read more

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I feel an obligation to be balanced Noted biologist comes to defense

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email ‘I feel an obligation to be balanced.’ Noted biologist comes to defense of gene editing babies George Church takes a more nuanced view than many scientists on the recently revealed gene editing of human babies. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img © Ken Richardson By Jon CohenNov. 28, 2018 , 2:50 PM When a researcher in China startled the world earlier this week with the revelation that he had created the first gene-edited babies, only one prominent scientist quickly spoke out in his defense: geneticist George Church, whose Harvard University lab played a pioneering role in developing CRISPR, the genome editor used to engineer embryonic cells in the hugely controversial experiment. Church has reservations about the actions of He Jiankui, the scientist in Shenzhen, China, who led the work.The fiercely debated experiment, described by He at a meeting in Hong Kong, China, today, used CRISPR to try to make the babies resistant to HIV by crippling a receptor, CCR5, that the virus uses to infect white blood cells. But Church also thinks there’s a frenzy of criticism surrounding He that exaggerates the severity of what one critic gingerly called his “missteps” but another called “monstrous.”ScienceInsider spoke with Church shortly before He’s lecture in Hong Kong, but Church had seen the data earlier. This interview has been edited for clarity and brevity. Q: What do you think of the criticism being heaped on He?A: I’d just as well not hang myself out to dry with someone I barely know, but I feel an obligation to be balanced about it. I’m sitting in the middle and everyone else is so extreme that it makes me look like his buddy. He’s just an acquaintance. But it seems like a bullying situation to me. The most serious thing I’ve heard is that he didn’t do the paperwork right. He wouldn’t be the first person who got the paperwork wrong. It’s just that the stakes are higher. If it had gone south and someone had been damaged, maybe there would be some point. Like what happened with Jesse Gelsinger [who died in a 1999 gene therapy experiment]. But is this a Jesse Gelsinger or a Louise Brown [the first baby born through in vitro fertilization] event? That’s probably what it boils down to.Q: Do you think the experiment is unethical?A: People have said there’s a moratorium on germline editing and I contributed to reports that called for that, but a moratorium is not a permanent ban forever. It’s a checklist of what you have to do. It really seems like he was checking off the published list [see p. 132] by the National Academy of Sciences and added a few things of his own. At some point, we have to say we’ve done hundreds of animal studies and we’ve done quite a few human embryo studies. It may be after the dust settles there’s mosaicism and off targets that affect medical outcomes. It may never be zero. We don’t wait for radiation to be zero before we do [positron emission tomography] scans or x-rays.Q: When did you learn about it and what was your reaction?A: About a week ago, and I was hoping he did everything right. You don’t have that many shots on goal. He’s not doing it the way I’d do it, but I’m hoping it doesn’t work out badly. As long as these are normal, healthy kids it’s going to be fine for the field and the family.Q: What do you think of his decision to cripple a gene to prevent HIV infection?A: It struck me as bold choice to do CCR5. In some ways it doesn’t make sense, but in another way it makes more sense than β-thalassemia or sickle cell, both of which you can prevent with preimplantation genetic diagnosis. [These genetic diseases are two prime targets of many CRISPR researchers.] The real issue is what’s the best first case.Q: But there’s a relatively low rate of HIV infection in Chinese women. This isn’t like in, say, KwaZulu Natal in South Africa, where the medical need to protect young women from the virus is great.A: This was a stretch, there’s no doubt about it. There could be a bunch of small risks. Quite clearly the major motivator was testing CRISPR.Q: What do you think of the criticism the experiment doesn’t address an “unmet medical need”?A: The unmet medical need is there is no cure or vaccine for HIV. And in that sense, there’s more of a medical need than there is for β-thalassemia, for which there is an alternative, unless both parents are homozygous. [If both parents have two copies of the mutant gene, all of their offspring will develop the disease.]Q: What about concerns that CRISPR will make unintended edits in the genome, so-called off-target effects?A: I’m not saying they’ll never be an off-target problem. But let’s be quantitative before we start being accusatory. It might be detectable but not clinical. There’s no evidence of off-target causing problems in animals or cells. We have pigs that have dozens of CRISPR mutations and a mouse strain that has 40 CRISPR sites going off constantly and there are off-target effects in these animals, but we have no evidence of negative consequences.Q: Would you have been part of this experiment?A: Probably not. But I probably wouldn’t have put the sequence of the 1918 flu virus or smallpox virus in the public domain. This is a slightly lower risk than putting potent pathogenic sequences in the public domain.Q: There’s some worry that the backlash to He’s experiment will harm the field.A: In the early days of gene therapies when there were far fewer preliminary studies, there were three deaths that set back the field. It may have just made us more cautious. And gene therapy is certainly back in force. And I don’t think these kids [the babies whose genomes He edited] are going to die.Q: What about the argument that He wasn’t transparent enough and should have published preliminary work and done more to make his intentions clear to the scientific community before implanting the embryos?A: Those are valid critiques, and he probably will pay some price. I’m a little extreme on the transparency end of the spectrum [Church’s website lists more than 100 affiliations he has with funders, companies, and nonprofits], and it’s nice to have company on that. But at some point, we should start focusing on the health of the babies.last_img read more

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Tom Hanks Earns Black Card By Playing Spades

first_img Caribbean beach full of tourists spades , Tim Allen , Tom Hanks , toy story 4 “Should I get a cup of coffee or something,” Allen asks helplessly.The contrast between the two was straight comedy.Watch the hilarious clip below. Because that clip had more than 41 million views, Xilla said he wanted to play a little game “to see if you have a Black card.” (For the uninitiated, a Black card is not a credit card. Instead, it is a premise loosely based on African American stereotypes that, if wielded correctly, will theoretically guarantee an open embrace from Black folks.“I feel like you guys both have Black cards,” Xilla says in earnest.With that, Xilla threw out an imaginary scenario surrounding Spades, the card game that is heavily associated with Black people where the Spades suit reigns supreme.Hanks immediately knew what Xilla was talking about and responded quickly with the correct answer. “I go deep, baby!” Hanks says, arms crossed on his chest in an apparent display of pride for knowing the answer.But Allen, on the other hand, admitted he was clueless and began acting like he was uncomfortable.“I don’t know what you guys are talking about,” Allen confessed matter of factly as Xilla can be heard giggling in the background. ““You don’t know how to play Spades??” Hanks asks Allen in disbelief.“I’m gonna say I do just so we can move on,” Allen said with a straight face.That prompted an animated Hanks to go on and flex more of his Black card muscle by adding that he used to play “whist” (also known as “Bid Whist”) while he was in Oakland, a decidedly Black city. A Complete, Recent Timeline Of Disaster For Americans Visiting The Dominican Republic Tom Hanks is so cool I tested his knowledge of black culture. pic.twitter.com/aGrJdD1Qjh— The All-Mighty Xilla Valentine (@BlogXilla) June 11, 2019SEE ALSO:College Dropout Candace Owens Gets Owned By Dr. Cornel West Debating SlaveryBlack Law Students Demand Columbia University Fire Lead Central Park 5 District Attorney All-time great actor Tom Hanks has singlehandedly redefined what it means for a white person to have a black card. At the same time, comedian Tim Allen showed he has quite a ways to go to achieve the same social status that will get someone invited to the cookout every time.In an amazing viral video making the rounds on social media Wednesday morning, Global Grind’s Xilla Valentine is shown interviewing the stars of the new movie “Toy Story 4,” which the duo has been out promoting. Xilla told Hanks that when he searched for the actor’s name on YouTube, “the first thing that comes up is Black Jeopardy.” That was a reference to the hilarious SNL skit where Hanks plays a contestant named Doug who wears a Make America Great Again hat while competing against two Black people.last_img read more

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