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first_imgShareTweet coshquinCoshquin information event on play facilities – McGinleyCOUNCILLOR ERIC MCGINLEYDerry and Strabane CouncilSinn Fein “Council officers have now prepared a draft design for play provision and it is important that residents have an opportunity to view these designs and offer their own suggestions and ideas.“We have now organised a public information event to be held upstairs in the Cosh Bar on Tuesday, 12th March and I would encourage parents and children to come along and have a look at the draft proposals.“The event is open from 6.00 pm to 8 pm and Council officers will be present to talk to residents who call through between these times.”Coshquin information event on play facilities – McGinley was last modified: March 5th, 2019 by John2John2 Tags:center_img Sinn Fein Councillor Eric McGinleyA public information event will be held in Coshquin next week organised by Sinn Féin on the need for play facilities in the area.Councillor Eric McGinley said: “From our discussions with residents in Coshquin it was evident that one of the priorities was the provision of play facilities for children in the area.last_img read more

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Years   Buy in November       Buy in May

first_img Years   Buy in November       Buy in May     Buy and Hold Modi has ridden this broad support to become the top candidate for India’s next prime minister. In fact, he may have already won by the time you read this. I’m writing on Thursday, and the election results are due out tomorrow. What’s so great about Modi? Yes, he’s promised a cure for India’s #1 economic problem by ushering in an infrastructure boom, but that hardly makes him special. Promising to build infrastructure in India is like promising to “create jobs” in the US: every candidate does it. The question is whether they can accomplish it. Stifled by India’s world-class bureaucracy, Modi’s predecessors have failed miserably. What makes Modi different is that he might actually deliver, as he’s shown a remarkable ability to get things done during his 13-year stint as chief minister of the Indian state of Gujarat. He upgraded infrastructure and attracted foreign investment, helping to grow Gujarat’s GDP by 10.3% per year in the last decade, besting India’s 7.9% growth rate. Even more impressively, Gujarat produces 25% of India’s exports despite being home to just 5% of its population. The Economist stated that “so many things work properly in Gujarat that it hardly feels like India.” Aggregate economic stats are one thing; Modi’s ability to build relationships and broker deals is another. In 2008, Tata Motors, an Indian car manufacturer, attempted to build a factory in the Indian state of West Bengal. It was to produce the Tata Nano, a no-frills mini-car that, at a cost of $2,500, would be the world’s cheapest car by a considerable margin. However, in true Indian bureaucratic fashion, the local government tied up the project in land disputes. As one of India’s poorest states, you’d think West Bengal would welcome the benefits a factory would bring. Nope. Twenty-eight months later, the factory still wasn’t finished, and Tata Motors pulled the plug. Upon hearing the news, Modi, ever the opportunist, sent the chairman of the company a one-word text. It read “Suswagatham,” which in Sanskrit means “Welcome.” Fourteen months later, the first Nano rolled out of a brand-new factory in Gujarat. Quite simply, Modi gets things done. In India’s jungle of red tape, he wields a razor-sharp machete. If he’s successful in breaking through India’s bureaucratic logjam to clear the way for upgrading its decrepit infrastructure, I think Indian stocks could enter an extended bull market. Whether or not you’re respecting seasonal trends by selling your US stocks this May (more on that in a moment), allocating a few percentage points of your portfolio to a stock or two on the Bombay exchange is a good idea. What Could Possibly Go Wrong with Relying on a Politician? You might be thinking—and I wouldn’t blame you for thinking it—“So you’re betting on a politician to keep his promises. What could possibly go wrong?” It’s a good point. Despite his impressive track record, Modi is still a politician. He could be lying. Or, even if his motivations are pure, he could fail. A skeptical Indian contact tells me that one man, no matter how competent, is no match for the entrenched Indian bureaucracy. There’s downside here. The question is: how much of it should you tolerate for a shot at big upside? That’s where investment strategy comes in. You have two choices for investing in India. Option #1: buy an index via an ETF. This quick and easy route will have a binary outcome. Either Modi is successful and stocks soar, or he fails and they languish. I prefer Option #2, which is to buy an Indian company that trades on a US exchange. There are several candidates, but one in particular stands out because it manufactures the very products needed to do the coming infrastructure work. And it’s diversified internationally: though the company dominates its particular market in India, Indian sales only account for 19% of its overall revenue. Here’s the best part. In our financial analysis, we stripped out the company’s Indian business and valued only its international business. We found that even if you assign its Indian business a value of zero, the company is still fairly to slightly undervalued. In other words, by buying this company at current prices, we’re getting a well-run international manufacturer at a fair price. Its Indian business is essentially a call option. If things work out in India as I expect, there’s serious upside. If they don’t, downside is limited, because we’re getting the Indian business essentially for nothing. Of course, I’m writing this last bit with hopes that you’ll take The Casey Report for a spin to get our team’s full analysis. With your risk-free 3-month trial to The Casey Report, you’ll get instant and complete access to our current issue, which features not only the company I’ve described above but a second Indian investment recommendation. Plus, you can read both the June and July issues before deciding if The Casey Report is for you. And if it’s not, just cancel for a no-questions-asked, full refund. Click here to get the current issue now. (Editor’s Note: The results of the Indian election are out this morning—and as expected, Modi won in a huge landslide. I suggest you try The Casey Report right now and get yourself a piece of that pie.) With that, I’ll now pass the baton to Gerald Simmons, whom you may recognize as winner of our Casey Research Storytelling Contest. I think you’ll enjoy his entertaining analysis on whether “Sell in May” is sound advice. Then, you’ll find some poor English translations in the Friday Funnies. Is This the Year to “Sell in May and Go Away”? By Gerald Simmons The world’s favorite season is the spring. All things seem possible in May. —Edwin Way Teale As I write, newly hatched birds are chirping, flowers are budding, and bees and butterflies flit in my backyard. It’s the time of year I look forward to the least. Sure, the days are longer and warmer: the kids are outside playing happily, and everyone is in a good mood in anticipation for their summer break. But I am preparing for battle. Anytime now, my body will be attacked by pollen that will make my eyes run and my body erupt in bouts of sneezing. Anytime now, my dental business will slow as people turn their attention to their impending vacations and away from their teeth. And anytime now, my brokerage and retirement accounts will come under siege as the “Sell in May” effect rears its ugly head. No one knows who started the “Sell in May and go away” mantra that surfaces every April, but we do know that it originated in the London Financial District. The theory is simple: the market underperforms during the May 1 – October 30 period. Ignore it at your peril. I did in 2008, and the results were… Well, let’s put it this way: have you ever done or not done something that your spouse will remind you of for the rest of your life? I have done both. The first was turning down tickets to a play rehearsal at which my wife would have met Glenn Ford at the intimate get-together afterwards. Now that he’s passed, that meeting will never occur. Consequently, I avoid Glenn Ford movies on TV, as they always elicit the line, “I could have met him.” The second was staying in the market during that gut-wrenching May to November period in 2008, which caused my wife to gasp: “You lost how much?” The subject reappears every time I suggest that an item she desires or an activity she’d like to do costs too much. Let’s start with the basics: how accurate is the “Sell in May” mantra? The Stock Trader’s Almanac examined the Dow from 1950 on and found that $1,000 invested in the market on November 1 and sold on April 30 every year grew to $78,171 by 2012. If you invested that same $1,000 in the market on May 1 and sold on October 31 each year, you’d have just $891 by 2012. Buying in November remains clearly superior to buying in May. But if your time horizon is long (30 years or more) and you have the emotional fortitude to endure drawdowns, buy and hold performs nearly as well as selling in May and buying back in November. Should You Sell This May? I will. Not only to avoid a repeat of 2008 and to stay in my wife’s good graces, but also because the current bull market is now 59 months old—10% longer than the average length of 54 months. Several other statistics support a cautious approach to the markets. The Shiller P/E ratio is currently 24.9, far above its long-term average of 16.3. And the margin debt-to-cash ratio is a nosebleed 1.62, meaning investors have $1.62 of debt for every $1.00 in their trading account. That’s higher than it was prior to the 2000 stock market peak. Further, recent turbulence has shown that it doesn’t take much to spook the market: a slowdown in China, Russia rattling its sabre, Fed Chair Yellen speaking off the cuff. And what if one of the problems that hardly anyone is talking about—like the massive buildup of unlikely-to-be-repaid student loan debt, or that most new auto loans are “subprime,” or that the European banks are again overextended—takes center stage? A 10-20% sell-off or worse would not be unreasonable—especially during summer doldrums, when trading volume dries up. Regardless of whether I’m right or wrong, you should have a plan ready to execute in case stocks do turn south. Have a Plan In college, my professor explained that there are only three ways to deal with certain physical human interactions: evade them, endure them, or enjoy them. It struck me as true in every facet of life, including investing. Evade: I’m planning to evade part of my slowdown at work by taking a vacation. Similarly, you can evade the May-November downturn by selling your stocks and mutual funds and sitting it out. This works best for 401(k)s and other retirement plans where your only options are to be long or in cash. You could, of course, sell just part of your portfolio if you’re worried about missing out on potential gains. Or, if you’re into reading charts, you could stay fully invested until confirmation of a downturn. I’m sure many of you have been in the market since the 2009 low. Your mutual funds and stocks should show healthy profits. This is an opportunity to reduce your allocation to stocks or rebalance your portfolio. If the market does sell off, wouldn’t it be nice to have cash on hand to pick up bargains on November 1? That would make your spouse happy. It works for mine. Endure: Much as I would like to evade my allergy problem, living in a self-contained bubble for the next three months is impossible. Enduring is my only option. Should you choose to endure the next six months in the stock market, tighten your stops. If you managed to pick a stock that rises in spite of the market falling, you’ll continue to make money. If the stock does hit your stop, you can always buy it back later, probably at a lower price. Hedging is also an option, specifically if you hold dividend stocks that you have no intention of selling for decades. You can buy puts on those stocks or sell covered calls against them. Enjoy: Day traders live for pullbacks. I’m not a day trader, so I won’t be selling short, buying puts for profit, or going long on rebounds. If you do choose to “enjoy” any pullback by employing these techniques, be highly selective. Take profits quickly and invest like a ninja: get in, get the job done, and get out. But if you don’t have the emotional fortitude or skills to navigate a down market, steer clear. Mistakes in a downtrend could cost you big. With the end of May rapidly approaching, I’m prepared. I have Zyrtec for my allergies, my vacation is set, and my stock market plan is in place. What are you going to do? Friday Funnies Poor English Translations 2008         <12.4%>          <27.3%> 1992 – 2012       10.0%             1.7%          8.5% 2009           13.3%            18.9% India just concluded the largest election in human history. At least 551 million Indians voted to fill the seats of Lok Sabha, India’s equivalent of the US House of Representatives. Whichever party wins a majority will appoint India’s next prime minister, the country’s most powerful person. If exit polls are correct, the election will be a game changer. The incumbent Indian National Congress (INC) party, which has dominated Indian politics for 50 years, will likely suffer a crushing defeat. Indians are fed up with their country’s lackluster growth and rightfully blame it on the INC’s inexcusable failure to facilitate the building of even passable infrastructure. That’s where Narendra Modi, superstar politico and leader of the opposition party, comes in. He is capitalizing on that disenchantment and tapping into Indians’ desire for change. A former Indian colleague (who lives in India) posted this on Facebook this morning. It sums up the country’s social mood: 2000         <2.2%>           2.2% 2001           9.6%         <15.5%> Because the Dow comprises only 30 stocks, other larger indices were analyzed to check the validity of the hypothesis. Ned Davis Research examined the S&P 500 over the same 30-year time period and found similar results: $1,000 grew to $75,539 during the November-April period, and to just $1,032 during the May-October period. In 2002, another pair of researchers, Bouman and Jacobsen, extended the analysis to the international equity markets and found the same effect in 35 of 37 countries. As the above research deliberately omitted dividends (no doubt to make the math easier), Alex Dumortier, a Princeton-educated economist, decided to incorporate them. As you can see below, dividends cloud the results: 2006           8.9%            6.3% 1982 – 2012       12.0%             4.1%        11.6% YEAR       Nov 1 – April 30         May 1 – October 31 2004           1.6%          <1.9%>center_img 2010           15.2%             1.0% 2002 – 2012         7.8%           -1.1%          4.8% 2012           13.3%            <0.9%> That’s It for This Week Don’t let me forget, though, to remind you that our fall Summit in San Antonio, TX, is coming up rapidly. If you haven’t received an email from us by the time this missive is published, look for it in your inbox. We already have a few exciting speakers on our faculty, and we’re feverishly working on getting the kind of top-notch lineup you’re used to from our Summits. Right now we have Grant Williams of Things That Make You Go Hmmm… fame (if you haven’t read his incredible free e-letter yet, please start doing so immediately—here’s a taste of what you’ve been missing)… we have Summit regular James Rickards, who just wrote a new book, the New York Times best-seller The Death of Money: The Coming Collapse of the International Monetary System… we have Charles Biderman, who has a very unique way of analyzing the stock market… we have former Dallas Fed economist Lacy Hunt, one of last year’s favorite speakers… and we have Christian Menegatti, right-hand man of Nouriel Roubini. And the list keeps getting longer: there are several brand-new additions to our faculty you won’t even see in our email—among them David Tice, president of Tice Capital and founder of the Prudent Bear Fund… and Worth Wray, chief investment strategist to John Mauldin and a contributor to Mauldin Economics. Go here for more information and to save your seat now—our early-bird discount is still on. Enjoy your weekend! 2003           4.3%           15.6% Dan Steinhart Managing Editor of The Casey Report 2005           8.9%            2.4% 2007         <7.9%>            6.6% 2011           10.5%            <6.7%> Dear Reader, Few things are as satisfying, at least to me, as making money off the government. I suspect that’s because all of my interactions with the government end with me being poorer. Like three weeks ago, when my wife got a $200 ticket for driving a perfectly safe 82 mph on an empty Vermont highway. Or every two weeks, when only 60% of my paycheck makes it into my bank account. So I relish any opportunity to turn the tables on our rulers. In this case, it’s not Uncle Sam offering the investment opportunity, but rather a foreign government’s imminent transition that I expect to invigorate certain businesses and reward investors with an extended bull market. A Man Who Gets Things Done 2013             6.6%              4.8% 2002           1.0%         <15.6%>last_img read more

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Using AAPL50515P125 to collect 455 instantly

first_img Using AAPL50515P125 to collect $455 instantly You don’t have to “invest” to make money. Instead, you can just sit back and collect other people’s investment losses… with just a single transaction. Click here for a live-recorded demo of how it works. Recommended Links China has entered the global currency war. Today it devalued its currency, the yuan, by the most it has in two decades. The yuan is different from most currencies. The price of currencies like the US dollar, the euro, and the yen all move around like a stock price. The market determines their prices. When investors buy, their price goes up. When investors sell, their price goes down. The price of the yuan does not move around like a stock price. The Chinese government controls the price of the yuan. So the yuan is worth whatever the Chinese government wants it to be worth. On Tuesday, the Chinese government decided to make the yuan worth 1.9% less. The Wall Street Journal called it “the most significant downward adjustment to the yuan since 1994, when as part of a break from Communist state planning, Beijing let the currency fall by one-third.” •  Regular readers know that China has big problems… The Chinese economy grew at its slowest pace in two decades during the first quarter of the year. And the Chinese stock market crashed 32% in just 17 days earlier this summer. China is devaluing the yuan to help its economy. Bloomberg explains how the strong yuan has been hurting China’s economy. A strong yuan had put pressure on China’s exports. The nation’s overseas shipments fell 8.3 percent from a year earlier in dollar terms in July, well below the estimate of a 1.5 percent decline in a Bloomberg survey. The Chinese government hopes that a weaker yuan will make Chinese exports cheaper… and help jumpstart the Chinese economy. •  The People’s Bank of China promises that it won’t devalue the yuan any more… But investors don’t believe it, as Bloomberg explains: The Chinese central bank’s move on Tuesday was a one-time adjustment, it said in a statement, adding that it plans to keep the yuan stable at a ’reasonable’ level and will strengthen the market’s role in determining the fixing. “They’re saying it’s a one-off, but I don’t think the market’s actually buying that,” said John Gorman, head of US dollar interest-rate trading for Asia and the Pacific at Nomura Holdings Inc. in Tokyo. “This might be the start of a broader change. That’s why the market is reacting so strongly.” — Regards, Justin Spittler Delray Beach, Florida August 11, 2015center_img •  The world is at war… But it’s not a shooting war. It’s a financial war. China is one of the last countries to join this war. Almost all other world governments have been devaluing their currencies for months or years. Just look at the performance of some of the most important currencies over the last year: The Japanese yen is down 18% against the US dollar The euro has dropped 18% The Australian dollar has dropped 21% The Canadian dollar has dropped 17% The New Zealand dollar has dropped 22% These countries’ central banks are devaluing their currencies on purpose. They don’t do it directly, like the Chinese government does with the yuan. They devalue their currencies indirectly by printing money and lowering interest rates. A weaker currency helps a country’s economy…at least in theory. A weak yen, for example, makes Japanese goods cheaper for buyers in other countries. So the Bank of Japan has weakened the yen to get people in other countries to buy more Japanese stuff. It sounds like a decent plan… Except when all countries try to do it at the same time. And today, pretty much all major countries are trying to devalue their currencies at the same time. So instead of gaining a competitive advantage, they’re simply destroying their currencies. •  Going Global 2015 is our survival guide for the global currency war… We wrote Going Global 2015 to show you how to protect yourself and your family from situations just like this. It’s a 233-page hardcover book full of easy steps for protecting yourself and your family from the effects of the global currency war. And right now, we’re giving this important book away for free. Click here to claim your copy. •  Media stocks had their worst two days since the financial crisis… US stocks have been in a huge bull market. Since bottoming in March 2009, the S&P 500 has risen 211%. Bloomberg explains how media stocks were a major driver of this rally…until now. More than technology or even biotech, media stocks have ruled the roost during the share advance that restored $17 trillion to American equity prices since the financial crisis. Companies from CBS Corp. to Tegna Inc. and Time Warner Cable Inc. are among stocks with the 60 biggest increases during the stretch… Until Tuesday, media shares were the best-performing shares of the bull market, rising 531 percent to eclipse automakers, retail stores and banks. The industry’s market capitalization was about $650 billion, compared with $135 billion in March 2009. Bloomberg notes “until Tuesday” because media stocks tanked last week. The S&P 500 Media Industry Group Index tracks 15 major media stocks. It tracks stocks like cable and film company Time Warner Cable (TWC) and entertainment giant Walt Disney Company(DIS). Last week, the index fell 8.2% in two days…its worst two consecutive days since November 2008. The sell-off started when Disney reported bad second-quarter results. The company said its operating income will likely fall $500 million short of original expectations. Disney’s share price plunged 8.4% on the news. Viacom Inc.(VIA.B), which owns Comedy Central and MTV, was next to report bad news. Its revenues dropped 11% from last quarter. Its stock lost 20% last week. Before last week, media stocks had gained 8.5% this year. Now they’re up just 1.4%…less than the S&P 500’s 2.2% gain in the same time. Chart of the Day Today’s chart shows the yuan’s 1.9% one-day drop vs. the US dollar. That might not sound like a huge drop. But it’s significant because it was the yuan’s biggest drop vs. the dollar in more than twenty years. And as you can see from the chart, it’s a huge move compared to how little the yuan usually moves against the dollar. The yuan is now at a three-year low against the dollar. Major Warning from Clinton’s Former Classmate Global Economist and NY Times best-selling author (and former classmate of Bill Clinton), says a huge economic storm is on the horizon… reveals #1 way to prepare (he did this himself). Click here to learn more. –last_img read more

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By Justin Spittler editor Casey Daily Dispatch

first_imgBy Justin Spittler, editor, Casey Daily Dispatch“I’ve never seen anything like this.” That’s a direct quote from Cam Battley. Battley is the executive vice president of Aurora Cannabis, one of Canada’s biggest marijuana companies. Before joining Aurora, Battley worked in the biotech and big pharma industries. In other words, he’s worked for some of the world’s most cutting-edge businesses.   And yet, he says nothing compares to Canada’s marijuana industry. “We are literally inventing a new industry in real time.” He’s not exaggerating…  • Canada’s legal marijuana market is being born before our eyes… In April, Canada’s prime minister, Justin Trudeau, introduced legislation to legalize marijuana outright. Starting next July, you’ll most likely be able to legally buy recreational marijuana across Canada.This will have huge implications for Canada’s current $400 million marijuana industry. Accounting firm Deloitte estimates that Canada’s marijuana market could become a $4 billion to $9 billion market once recreational use is legalized.That means Canada’s legal marijuana economy is about to grow at least tenfold ($400 million to $4 billion) in size… practically overnight.In short, demand for marijuana in Canada is about to skyrocket. But it’s not ready for this coming surge… — • You can’t say the same thing about U.S. marijuana producers… They can’t even ship marijuana across state lines, let alone overseas. That’s because marijuana is a Schedule 1 drug at the federal level. The Feds consider it more dangerous than cocaine or meth. This stance isn’t just idiotic. It’s holding back the entire U.S. marijuana industry. That’s why I’ve been urging readers to buy Canadian marijuana stocks instead of U.S. listings.• Canada’s government actually supports marijuana… That gives Canadian marijuana companies a huge edge over their competitors to the south. It also puts them at the forefront of the global marijuana boom. That’s something every speculator should understand. You see, the global legal marijuana market is exploding right now. It’s already a $14.3 billion industry. And Ameri Research says it will be a $63.5 billion market by 2024. In other words, the global marijuana market is expected to more than quadruple in size over the next seven years.• Investing opportunities like this don’t come along often… So, consider buying Canadian marijuana stocks if you haven’t already. They’re in the best position to profit from the coming “green gold rush.” And they give you the best chance to become a “marijuana millionaire.” You can begin your research by checking out this complete list of Canadian marijuana stocks.But don’t worry if you’re not Canadian. Many of these stocks also trade on U.S. exchanges. That makes them as easy to buy as other U.S. stocks. In other words, you don’t have to be Canadian to take advantage of this opportunity. Just don’t wait too long to act… Soon, the rest of the world will realize that Canada’s the place to invest in marijuana. When this happens, investors will pour money into tiny Canadian marijuana stocks.And that could cause some Canadian pot stocks to soar 1,000% in a matter of months.You may find that hard to believe. But many small Canadian pot stocks soared that much or higher during the first wave of marijuana stock mania.That’s why you can’t afford to let this opportunity pass you by.Regards,Justin Spittler Denver, Colorado September 12, 2017 P.S. Most people don’t know this, but Doug Casey was an early investor in a pot company. In November 2014, he bought a penny pot stock for $0.10 a share. A recent Canadian filing in June put the stock at $2. That’s a gain of 1,900%. Today, Doug’s investment is worth $1 million. And his team has just revealed another incredible opportunity in the pot market in this exclusive new video. It explains how to access their best research on marijuana stocks. You can watch it right here.Reader Mailbag Today, many kind words for Doug and his essay on “The War on Some Drugs”… I just read “The War on Some Drugs” and I must say it was spot-on. Well done. Too bad however, since the fools making the laws can’t read. –Chris You see, it currently has just 1.4 million square feet of licensed marijuana production space. That might sound like a lot. But it’s not nearly enough to satisfy all its pent-up demand.   In fact, some experts say Canada will need at least 14 million square feet of dedicated production space by next summer. That’s 10x more than its current capacity.• This is why Aurora is building a massive marijuana production facility in Edmonton… Aurora will finish construction on the facility next year. Upon completion, the facility known as Aurora Sky will be an 800,000-square-foot building. That will make it the world’s largest marijuana production facility. The facility will also house 17 growing bays. Aurora hopes this extra capacity will help it satisfy Canada’s coming demand surge. But that’s not the only reason it’s aggressively ramping up production.• Aurora wants a piece of the global marijuana market, too… It specifically wants to export marijuana to Germany through its subsidiary Pedanios. And it’s not the only producer with its sights set on global domination. Other Canadian companies are already shipping marijuana to Australia, Brazil, the Cayman Islands, Chile, and Croatia. Recommended Link — Doug Casey’s $1 Million Pot Deal… Was it Legal? Doug Casey recently made a million bucks on an underground pot deal. He could make more, too – even $2 million. What did he do? More importantly: how can YOU get in on these pot mega profits? There’s a new pot boom set to be 7 times bigger than the first pot mania… It will kick off on October 31, when a new law passes. Here’s the whole story… Recommended Link If you ever run for public office, you will never be elected. You make too much sense. You are the first person that I have ever read that I agree with regarding the drug problem. But I’m close to 80 and obviously been senile my whole life. If you ever come to Cleveland, OH, I would like to shake your hand and I would VOTE for you. Keep up the good work. –Robert Did Wall Street try to “Watergate” Agora Financial? This is surveillance-cam footage of a recent midnight break-in at Agora Financial’s Baltimore headquarters. But what’s even more shocking is WHY it’s believed they broke in… Think “Wall Street” and “Watergate” and you’ll be on the right track. This shocking story could affect the entire Agora Financial readership, and even you. To find out exactly how, click right here. Well said. This column echoes my thinking exactly. –Patlast_img read more

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Justins note Over the past few months Ive shar

first_imgJustin’s note: Over the past few months, I’ve shared a handful of essays from my colleague, master trader Jeff Clark…and our readers continue to write in with positive feedback.As I’ve told you, Jeff’s one of the best traders I’ve met—and his track record can attest. Since 2005, his subscribers have had the opportunity to make triple-digit gains over 50 times and double-digit gains more than 160 times.If you’re interested in becoming a better trader, the following essay is required reading. In it, Jeff shares one of the most important lessons of his career… By Jeff Clark, editor, Market Minute I was only 19 years old when I made my first options trade. I had a gut feeling the market was going to go higher… so I bought four S&P 100 call options at $1.50 – a total investment of $600. A few hours later, the options were trading at $4.50. I sold and took the $1,200 profit – a 200% gain. And I was hooked on options forever. [A stock option is a contract to buy or sell a stock. Each contract represents 100 shares. And each contract is fixed at a certain price… and expires on a specific date. A call option is an agreement to buy a stock. A put option is an agreement to sell.] — Recommended Link Silicon Valley Rocket Scientist’s January 12th Prediction Could Lead to 35,000% Growth Watch him lay out his bold prediction in full detail here. My next trade was in tech giant IBM (IBM). I​ bought 10 $1 calls for a total of $1,000. This time, it took a couple of days to double my money. Next, I bought Digital Equipment put options… which nearly tripled in just a few days. I made 17 trades during my first six weeks as a trader. Every single one was a winner. Going 17 for 17 was a remarkable feat for a rookie trader – especially since I wasn’t using any sort of fundamental or technical analysis. I was just going with my gut. But I was careful not to put more than $1,000 or $2,000 into any single trade. And I still managed to turn my $5,000 brokerage account into $50,000 in just six weeks… And then I decided it was time to get serious. No more tiny trades. I was too good for the small stuff. For whatever reason, I had figured out a way to beat the market. Heck, I had just rattled off 17 straight triple-digit winners. So I decided to take the $50,000 in my account, add to it my $25,000 in savings, and put it into a handful of options trades. —center_img Recommended Link You can probably guess what happened next… The stock market has a habit of humbling folks who think they’ve figured it out. For me, the humbling started right away. At first, the positions started slightly moving against me. It was nothing to be concerned about. One good day would put everything back in the profit column. But then, one by one, each position blew up on me. It was too painful to watch. I kept the television off and avoided reading the newspaper for fear I’d see something bad about the stock market and my positions. When I finally got up enough courage to call the branch manager and check on the status of my account, I learned all the gains I had built up over the previous six weeks were gone. “Just sell everything,” I said. That was an expensive lesson to learn. But it’s one every options trader learns at some point. I was just fortunate it happened to me early in my career. You see, that experience changed how I looked at trading. Instead of using options as vehicles for speculation – a way to juice my returns and get more bang for my buck – I started using them the way they were intended to be used: as a way to reduce risk. Options allow investors to hedge their positions… and to risk much less money than they would if they bought a stock outright. Rather than purchasing 100 shares at $10 per share, an investor could buy one call option for $50 and have the right, but not the obligation, to purchase the same number of shares at an agreed-upon time in the future. This is a simple example. But the simplicity proves my point. Options allow you to risk much less and profit just as much as you would by buying stocks. Today, I still do my fair share of speculating. But I’m not focused on how much money I can make. I’m focused on how little I can lose. That’s a huge difference. It has allowed me to trade options successfully for three decades. And it allowed me to retire at 42. Best regards and good trading, Delbert made $151,000 from Teeka Tiwari’s crypto plays, here’s his letter: I am a 67-year-old retired school teacher and small business owner from Greencastle, PA… When Teeka began providing information on the cryptocurrencies, I was intrigued. I bought a $5,400 stake in October 2016. This morning it was $74,200!!!! As a follow-up, within a few more weeks my stake had climbed to over $151,000… $5,400 to $151,000 in 8 months!!!!!! Here’s how to get Teeka’s research right away… Jeff Clark Editor, Market Minute Justin’s note: If you haven’t signed up for Jeff’s free Market Minute newsletter yet, I highly recommend it. It hits my inbox at 7:30 a.m. ET every trading day, and tells me everything I need to know about the coming day’s market action. Since it debuted earlier this year, it’s quickly helped me become a better trader. And it will help you, too. You can sign up for the Market Minute with just one click right here.last_img read more

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By WVUA 23 Web Coordinator David Williams III Duri

first_imgBy WVUA 23 Web Coordinator David Williams IIIDuring the Tuscaloosa City Council Public Safety Committee meeting, the crime numbers for the first three months were released for the previous year.Burglaries were reported down 15 percent, robberies down 8 percent, and unlawful breaking and entering down 2 percent compared to reports from last year. But homicides and attempted murder are up.“Overall, you know we do need to remember that crime is prevalent in our communities especially in Districts 1 and 2, so we want to do what we can as a community to make sure that crime is being handled in the most effective way,” said Raevan Howard, the councilwoman for District 2.The data also showed that from Jan. 1 to March 25 that District 7 numbers have slightly decreased. Both burglaries and unlawful breaking and entering cases decreased, however District 7 lead in homicides.“Councilwoman McKinstry has been effective at decreasing some of the particular types of crime in her community and so I believe that gives everyone else a positive outlook that if we stay persistent and talk to our residents and stay motivated to support our police department, that is already doing a great job, that we can also have that same type of success in our communities to see crime decrease,” said Howard.Howard said the city is looking at ways to build a better relationship between the community and the police department, hoping it could help bring down crime.Below are the full statistics released by the Tuscaloosa Police Department.last_img read more

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Northport City Administrator Bruce Higginbotham is

first_imgNorthport City Administrator Bruce Higginbotham is vacating his post so he can get back to doing what he loves most.Higginbotham told WVUA 23 News that while he’s enjoyed his time as city administrator, he misses doing engineering consulting.Higginbotham has been city administrator since 2017. He replaced Scott Collins, who resigned in 2016.He’s not yet announced the exact date of his resignation.last_img

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SOCHI Russia — Teemu Selanne scored two goals and

first_imgSOCHI, Russia — Teemu Selanne scored two goals and Tuukka Rask had a 26-save shutout, helping Finland rout the United States 5-0 Feb. 22 to win hockey bronze at the Sochi Olympic Games.Selanne, a 43-year-old, six-time Olympian, and Jussi Jokinen scored 11 seconds apart early in the second period. The Finns scored three goals in the third period against a team that looked like it would rather be at home.Finland has won four medals in the last five Olympics, more than any other nation in the NHL era.Before the third-place match became a rout in the final period, it was a game of missed opportunities for the Americans. Patrick Kane couldn’t convert on a penalty shot in each of the first two periods for the U.S.(Larry Lage,  AP Hockey Writer) TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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ATHENS – A 10yearold Irish fan of Greek striker

first_imgATHENS – A 10-year-old Irish fan of Greek striker Georgios Samaras who captured attention with his delight over the player during the World Cup was honored along with him Dec. 15 by the Greek Sports Journalists’ Association, which honored outstanding achievements in sports in a gala in Athens.Jay Beatty, who has Down’s syndrome, became a fan of Samaras when the Greek soccer star was playing for Celtic – the boy’s favorite team. They became media sensations when Samaras picked him up from the crowd when the Glasgow team lifted the Scottish Premiership trophy in May.Fans of both laughed a social media campaign to try to get the boy to the World Cup in Brazil but the dates clashed with a family holiday and he couldn’t accept an invitation from the Greek Soccer Federation.Jay’s father, however, posted a video showing the young boy in a Greece jersey and celebrating the team’s victory over Ivory Coast which went viral.Samaras was awarded for his “contribution to sports and his ethos” at the event held at the Peace and Friendship Stadium. The award was for “the message of humanity and sensitivity which they sent worldwide.”“This event is being televised live to the Greek nation and Jay will be receiving an award on the night along with his hero Samaras,” Martin Beatty, the boy’s father, was quoted by the Belfast Telegraph as saying prior to the trip to Greece. “It’s hard to believe that a wee 10-year-old boy with Down’s syndrome will be flying to Athens to receive this.”Wee Jay celebrates his 11th birthday on December 23.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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ATHENS – Following a riotfilled cancellation with

first_imgATHENS – Following a riot-filled cancellation with its rival Olympiacos, Panathinaikos Chairman Yiannis Alafouzos resigned and said the team may pull out of the Greek soccer Super League.Greece allows fans to bring flares and other objects that could be used as weapons into games that are frequently marred by violence and clashes with police.Panthainikos is upset that the referee called off the game after an Olympiacos player was hit by a flare thrown by Greens fans before the warm-up had begun.The club, which criticized the fans that threw the flares onto the pitch, believes that this triggered the angry reaction that followed,, leaving three police hurt and 16 arrested. This kind of trouble is common in Greek soccer, a sport accused of being rigged with match-fixing.Alafouzos said that he would ask Panathinaikos’s board to discuss on Nov. 22 whether the team should be withdrawn from the championship.The was postponed after home fans clashed with police before the game and threw flares at Olympiakos players as they walked out onto the pitch.Referee Andreas Pappas waited half an hour beyond the scheduled kickoff on Nov. 21 but eventually decided that the conditions were unsafe.The club has hotly contested his decision, while condemning the violence. “I intend to submit my resignation. I will propose to the board to consider whether Panathinaikos should continue to participate in the league,” Alafouzos, one of Greece’s major media moguls, said.Earlier, the club had issued a statement blaming “the individual action of 2-3 fools” for throwing the flares, but also the referee whose “entirely mistaken and irresponsible decision” to abort the game led to the violence, according to the club.Panathinaikos fans light flares after the cancellation. (AP Photo/Yorgos Karahalis)Panathinaikos will likely forfeit the game and, depending on the referee’s report, it could also be docked points, fined and made to play a number of home games behind closed doors.Clashes between Panathinaikos fans and police started outside the venue about two hours before the game when fans, apparently without tickets, attempted to storm the gates and threw rocks at the police.Collisions between police and fans continued inside the ground until it was evacuated about an hour after the referee decided not to start the match. Journalists were also set upon.The empty field was littered with hundreds of broken plastic chairs and a few metal pipes.A flare thrown from the stands hit Olympiacos forward Alfred Finnbogason in the leg. The Iceland international, on loan to Olympiakos from Real Sociedad, was filming the clashes with his cellphone.Olympiacos officials said he suffered mild burns and was spared a worse injury because he, like his fellow players, had not taken off his tracksuit. Defender Luka Milivojevic was also injured, the team announced.Olympiacos finally left the central Athens stadium two hours after the game was canceled, as police made sure nearby streets were safe.No Olympiacos fans attended the game. It is standard policy in the violence-plagued Greek league not to allow visiting fans to attend.“Over 50 persons were detained inside and outside the stadium…so far, 16 have been charged” with various offenses, police announced, adding that 3 policemen had been injured in the clashes.(Material from the Associated Press was used in this report)TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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One of world basketballs greatest rivalries lived

first_imgOne of world basketball’s greatest rivalries lived up to the hype on Friday with a spectacular thriller that visiting Olympiacos Piraeus took by 77-79 from archrivals Panathinaikos Athens with a classic connection in the final seconds. Vassilis Spanoulis controlled the final possession for Olympiacos, driving toward the lane then feeding his long-time partner Georgios Printezis for a layup and free throw that decided the outcome. The result broke a tie in the standings between them, raising Olympiacos to a 5-3 record and dropping Panathinaikos to 4-4. Spanoulis finished with 22 points and 8 assists for the winners, while Printezis had 16 and Daniel Hackett 11. Nick Calathes led the Greens with 16 points and 9 assists, while Chris Singleton and K.C. Rivers scored 14 each, and Antonis Fotsis 13. Olympiacos controlled the game until Panathinaikos rallied to lead 76-72 on the 300th career triple by Fotsis with 2:16 to play. Free throws by Spanoulis and a steal plus basket by Printezis tied the score before the final play between them settled it in favor of the visitors. Panathinaikos played without James Gist, who was injured in the previous game, as well as Mike James, out since preseason.Khem Birch was the early protagonist for Olympiacos as he dropped 2 shots in close to open the scoring and soon was fed by Spanoulis for a pair of dunks. When Vangelis Mantzaris blasted a triple, Olympiacos had a 6-11 lead. Triples from Fotsis and James Feldeine changed the scoreboard from deep, then Spanoulis and Singleton did the same as their four triples in succession left a 17-16 Panathinaikos lead. The lead change hands by the shot until it was a 23-23 tie after 10 minutes. Hackett came off the bench with a layup, a corner triple and a short jumper to give Olympiacos a 0-9 start to the second quarter and a 23-30 advantage. Another series of back-and-forth three-pointers by Spanoulis Singleton, Erick Green, Ioannis Bourousis and Spanoulis again highlighted the run to halftime. Spanoulis’s last of four triples on the night supplied the first double-digit lead at 35-45, while Printezis scored right before the half to preserve a 39-47 advantage for the visitors. Calathes led the charge as Panathinaikos climbed back into it after the break. There were dueling shots from deep again as Rivers made his first pair, but Hackett shot a rainbow from the arc to keep Olympiacos up 55-61. Calathes hit one to get the Greens closer and Fotsis another to tie before a Nikos Pappas layup ahead of the third-quarter buzzer restored the first Panathinaikos lead since the first quarter, 63-61. Matt Lojeski’s triple opened the final quarter with another lead change, 63-64. Despite another shot from downtown by Ioannis Papapetrou, Pappas hit free throws and a layup to tie 67-67. Papapetrou and Spanoulis put the Reds up 67-71 midway through the quarter, but Rivers stepped up and swished back-to-back threes to suddenly catapult the Greens in front and the next one by Fotsis made it 76-72 with 2 minutes left. Spanoulis and Printezis took matters into their hands, helped by a decision to foul Calathes, who made 1 of 2 free throws with 26 seconds left, for the last Panathinaikos lead. There was one possession left, and once again, the leaders of Olympiacos decided a major win.Source: EuroleagueTweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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MEMPHIS Tenn AP — The Milwaukee Bucks are doin

first_imgMEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — The Milwaukee Bucks are doing more than just winning. They are dominating opponents.The Bucks won their third straight game and 14th of the last 17 Wednesday night with a 111-101 victory over the Memphis Grizzlies.The victory marked the 23rd time the Bucks have won by double-digits and they entered the game with a 16.2-point winning margin in their previous 13 victories.Wednesday’s win over Memphis would have added to that point differential, if not for a closing run by the Grizzlies. Milwaukee led by 31 in the fourth quarter with about 8 minutes left.Giannis Antetokounmpo led the Bucks with 27 points and 11 rebounds, while Eric Bledsoe had 16 points, 12 of which came during a momentum-swinging third quarter.Memphis had pulled ahead 59-58 for its only lead of the game and Antetokounmpo was headed to the bench with his fourth foul, a situation that should have meant advantage Grizzlies.Milwaukee Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo, center, drives between Memphis Grizzlies guard Mike Conley (11) and forward Jaren Jackson Jr. in the first half of an NBA basketball game Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Memphis, Tenn. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill)Instead, Bledsoe scored nine straight points, part of the Bucks reeling off a 19-0 run to end of any Memphis hopes.“Eric Bledsoe was phenomenal. He really changed the game,” Milwaukee coach Mike Budenholzer said, later adding: “We needed him. We needed someone to step up and have a game like that.”The Memphis situation is entirely different from the Bucks. The Grizzlies lost their third straight and are 7-20 since starting the season 12-5. And that third quarter in which the Bucks took over the game was the latest nightmare for the Grizzlies.The 19-0 Milwaukee burst led to the Bucks outscoring Memphis 41-28 in the frame. And Memphis coach J.B. Bickerstaff continued to repeat the key stat in his postgame comments — eight turnovers for 20 Milwaukee points in the third.“It’s pretty simple,” Bickerstaff said. “Unforced turnovers, live ball turnovers at the top of the floor that lead to transition dunks, easy baskets.”The Memphis reserves played better than the starters, with Omri Casspi leading the Grizzlies with 17 points, JaMychal Green added 14 points, along with 10 rebounds and three blocks. Mike Conley and Marc Gasol also scored 14 points each for Memphis.And the Memphis miseries are leading to frustration for the Grizzlies.Milwaukee Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo (34) controls the ball against Memphis Grizzlies forward Jaren Jackson Jr. (13) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Memphis, Tenn. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill)“We’ve lost 10, lost 11, so we’ve got to take a stance as a team and we’ve got to stop this slide,” Casspi said. “It’s been like that for a while, so enough talking. We’ve got to do more on the court.”TIP-INSBucks: Milwaukee leads the series 23-22. . Antetokounmpo recorded his 30th double-double of the season. . Memphis defeated the Bucks 116-113 on Nov. 14. Milwaukee is now 5-0 facing teams that it lost to in its previous meeting. … Milwaukee made 23 of 44 shots in the second half, including 9 of 20 from outside the arc.Grizzlies: Memphis played its only home game in a five-game stretch. . Memphis missed 10 of its first 11 shots in the game, part of the Grizzlies shooting 26 percent in the opening quarter. . The Bucks’ 41 points in the third quarter was the most given up by Memphis in any period this season. … .JaMychal Green recorded his fifth double-double of the season.NEXT STARTERAs Bickerstaff tries to find some combination to get a boost for his team, he inserted Justin Holiday into the starting lineup. Holiday, obtained from the Chicago Bulls in a Jan. 4 trade, lasted about four minutes before he picked up his second foul and didn’t re-enter the game until the second half. “We need him to play well,” Bickerstaff said. “We need him to be comfortable so that he can contribute at the level that we think we can.” Holiday finished with five points, including making his first 3-pointer for Memphis.VIEW FROM THE BENCHAntetokounmpo got an observer’s view of the run by the Bucks as he had just left the game with four fouls when the Bucks clicked off the 19-0 rally. “(It was) our pace,” he said of the run. “We were able to get in passing lanes, get some deflections. We made them turn the ball over and we were able to run, create threes, easy looks, easy layups.“I think Bledsoe did a good job of setting the tone and everybody else followed.”UP NEXTBucks: At Orlando to face the Magic on SaturdayGrizzlies: Face the Celtics in Boston on Friday—By CLAY BAILEY , Associated PressTweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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Stefanos Tsitsipas is in the Dubai Championship fi

first_imgStefanos Tsitsipas is in the Dubai Championship final, knocking Frenchman Gaël Monfils out of the competition. The 20-year-old Greek tennis produced a sparkling physical and mental performance to overturn an initial 0-1 Montfils advantage to (4-6) in the first set of play. As if that wasn’t enough by itself, Tsitsipas took both tie-breaking sets with scores of 7-6 (4) and 7-6 (4) on his way to earning his place in the Dubai Championship final. With the finals qualification, in just his second Dubai Championship appearance, Tsitsipas will begin next week in the top 10 in the global rankings for the first time in his career, since he has surpassed Croatian Marin Čilić in points who, up until this point, held onto the 10th spot globally.  Following eight consecutive wins, the Dubai Championship final provides Tsitsipas with his first back-to-back ATP tournament finals appearances and he will compete for his third career title overall and the first tournament within the 500 series against Swiss legend Roger Federer (6-2, 6-2 vs. Ćorić) Saturday!THIS is what the crowd came to see ?@StefTsitsipas and @Gael_Monfils lighting up the @DDFTennis ?? @TennisTV pic.twitter.com/npvTDCaZ4K— ATP Tour (@ATP_Tour) March 1, 2019Speaking at the press conference after his quarter-final battle with Poland’s Hubert Hurkacz, Tsitsipas spoke about what he’s been chasing since the start of 2019, and how close he is to achieving that goal. “I think about it almost everyday, I want it a lot, I would really like it to happen. Because I am so close, I want it to happen as quickly as possible. I personally feel that I have game to be there already. I will take it even if it is a little later than I would have wanted, but again, as quickly as possible. It would also be good for my self-confidence”, said Stefanos Tsitsipas about his imminent ascent into the ranks of  Top 10 men’s tennis players in the world. Asked about the semifinal he said, “We both serve well. We have a similar playing style. I think that I am a little bit more aggressive and he’s much faster than me. I will have to deal with all of that. The smile says it all ?See you in the final, @StefTsitsipas ?@DDFTennis | #DDFTennis pic.twitter.com/Aa6vfkAq64— ATP Tour (@ATP_Tour) March 1, 2019“I think about it almost every day, I want it a lot, I really want it to happen. Because I’m so close, I want it to be done as soon as possible. I personally feel I have the game to be there already. Let it happen even a little later, but as soon as possible. It will be good for my self-confidence, “said Stefanos Tsitsipas for his imminent entry to the top ten.Asked about the semi-final said: “We both serve well. We have a similar style of play. I guess I’m a little more aggressive, and he’s a lot quicker. I have to deal with all of that, I need to be patient, have passion and await my opportunity. I will have to serve very well. I will have to serve well to win, otherwise it’s going to be sticky situation”.Stefanos Tsitsipas of Greece returns the ball to Gael Monfils of France during their semi final match at the Dubai Duty Free Tennis Championship, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Friday, March 1, 2019. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)“I continued to be Stefanos”In statements he made after the quarter-finals matchup, Tsitsipas analyzed the match and spoke about the art of tennis. “The break in the 3rd set cleared my mind a little bit. He was finding his game and got into a rhythm, so that break refreshed my mental state, it made me come back stronger and made me raise my level of play in the 3rd set. He absolutely deserve credit because it is not easy to come back when an opponent serves for the win at 5-4. He played brave tennis and showed character, i knew however that if I kept fighting and if I continued to be Stefanos on the court, I would have other opportunities to pick up the win,” said the 20-year-old. “ I try to be an artist on and off the court. I think that it is important to have that sort of artistic lifestyle. Not many people have that, I try to do it. I am certain that a lot of people have something artistic inside of them but they just haven’t found it yet. I think that tennis is a form of art, you can create art through the sport”.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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As dense smoke from regional wildfires spread thro

first_imgAs dense smoke from regional wildfires spread through communities across western Montana last summer, public health agencies faced an indoor problem, too: Residents suddenly needed filters to clean the air inside homes and public spaces, but there was no obvious funding source to pay for it.Ellen Leahy, the health officer in charge of the Missoula City-County Health Department, says in the past, when wildfire smoke polluted the air outside, nobody really talked about air filters.”We’d always told people to go indoors, thinking the air might be a little better,” Leahy says. “Well that was not necessarily true anymore.” The size and proximity of fires, coupled with weather trends and local topography, led to an inversion layer of dirty air that hung around communities for weeks on end. Without air filtration systems, it invaded indoor spaces too.Wildfire smoke is bad for everybody, but especially older people and those with chronic heart and lung diseases. Joy and Don Dunagan, who live in Seeley Lake, Mont., check both those boxes.”We put towels around the doors, the windows — everything,” Joy says. “It’s not dirt. Grime from the smoke came in through the whole house.”They’re both 69 years old, and on oxygen a lot of the time. Joy is a survivor of stroke. And Don recently developed asbestosis after almost 40 years of work in an aluminum factory.”I’ve got less than 50 percent breathing capacity right now,” he says. “Anything that I could have done a year ago, I can’t do now. And then that smoke on top of it — it was killing me.”But with no family in the state and limited mobility, the couple had to stay inside their house all summer. So Amy Cilimburg, who directs a small nonprofit called Climate Smart Missoula, helped the Dunagans get a HEPA air filter and make a safe air space inside their home. On the day I visit, she’s installing a second filter in their living room.”It’s the same filter, so it works the same way,” Cilimburg explains.The unit resembles a space heater, but can actually scrub out the fine particulates in wood smoke that are so hazardous to health.”There’s a prefilter that takes out the large stuff, and then — that’s the HEPA filter,” Cilimburg says, pointing to another part of the device. “So you want to make sure that one’s in there.”In early 2017, Missoula County’s Health Department launched a pilot program with Climate Smart to get HEPA air filters to homebound seniors in Missoula ahead of the fire season. But when wildfire smoke swamped Seeley Lake last summer, they also started to distribute filters to residents who have a high risk of developing breathing problems and other health issues related to smoke pollution. Local health providers helped identify those people, including the Dunagans.Don says he slept in his recliner, near the air filter, every single night while the smoke was bad.”I believe that machine saved my life,” he says. “I really do.”Then the wildfires dragged on into the school year. And kids, who are also extra susceptible to the pollutants because their lungs are still developing, sat in smoke-filled classrooms across the county.Missoula County’s health department and Climate Smart scrambled to get air filters to the schools most deeply enveloped by smoke. Other nonprofits pitched in to raise money and buy filters too. Almost overnight, the smoky haze inside classrooms disappeared.The county health department’s Leahy says that strategy of finding a solution and taking action was a big shift away from the agency’s usual approach of issuing advisories to people to hunker down and stay indoors. And they need to keep acting, she says.”There has to be a more concerted effort — which we are a part of — to provide clean, indoor air. Filtered indoor air. Messaging that the air isn’t good — isn’t enough,” Leahy says. “And that we have to plan to be able to do that, and deploy those systems much more quickly, as you would in an emergency.”The challenge is figuring out who pays for it.Portable HEPA air filters that can clean a big room cost just under $200 each. Even with a bulk discount, it cost about $30,000 to put those kinds of filters in just three of the 50 schools in the county last fire season. That didn’t even cover every classroom or grade, Leahy says.Nor are individual filters necessarily the most efficient solution for schools and other big buildings — like daycare centers, nursing homes or health clinics — says Missoula county air quality specialist Sarah Coefield. It’s virtually impossible, Coefield says, to put a price tag on what it would cost to filter the air in every public space in the county.”It would be a very high number, and I haven’t even wrapped my head around it,” she says.Missoula County has one of the biggest and most experienced air quality programs in the state, but the health department was not equipped to launch response on a large scale, Leahy says.The health department is set up to regulate easily controlled, man-made sources of air pollution — such as factories or wood stoves — and to issue health advisories. The money the county contributed at the last minute to buy filters came from emergency funds, which quickly dried up.Health officer Leahy says they all tried their best to respond to the need.”But it was very — it was creative,” she says. “I would say makeshift.”Scientists predict wildfires are going to get worse, so public health departments are starting to see a need for a more proactive approach. That’s going to require still more creativity, says Leahy.”There’s not a new source of funding that we’re aware of,” she says, “that can say, ‘Well, how can we at the local level try to help people with exposure to wildfire smoke in the same way that we at the local level try to do on wood stoves?’ There’s not a [funding] pathway for us to do that, at this time.”The state health department is in a similar bind. Currently, they have no resources specifically dedicated to protecting the public from wildfire smoke.”I don’t anticipate that there’s going to be a lot of new monies coming,” says Jim Murphy, the chief of the communicable disease bureau at Montana’s Department of Public Health & Human Services. “Given the state’s budget crisis, I think it’s maybe making the best of what we already have.”Cilimburg of Climate Smart says she’s proud of Missoula’s leadership and of the community’s efforts to step up. But she stresses that wildfire seasons are getting longer and more intense — the smoke will come back.”Providing some money up front can save you money down the road,” Cilimburg says. “And we’re just not very good sometimes at thinking about it. We’re good at responding to disasters, and not as good as being prepared for them up front. That’s kind of the conversations we’d like to spark.”For now, the county health department will continue to partner with Climate Smart. This winter, they’re busy building on the foundation they established over the summer — spreading the word about the usefulness of air filters and the message that clean air is a collective responsibility.The program has a cache of about 100 filters to help those in need. And they’re working with larger public institutions, like school districts, to help them improve their air filtration systems — and encouraging them to add such systems to their own budgets.Dunagan says the responsibility is also on everyone who lives in the area to acknowledge the risks of living with wildfire, and to create their own clean-air space.”A lot of people don’t realize what that smoke will do to you,” Dunagan says. “You might tough it out now, but if you go long enough, you’re going to have breathing problems.”This story is part of NPR’s reporting partnership with Montana Public Radio and Kaiser Health News. Copyright 2018 Montana Public Radio. To see more, visit Montana Public Radio.last_img read more

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Will people drink less sugary soda if the price go

first_imgWill people drink less sugary soda if the price goes up? A new study suggests the answer is … yes.Researchers at Drexel University surveyed residents of Philadelphia both before and after a 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax on sweetened drinks took effect. They also surveyed people in three other cities that don’t have a beverage tax. The researchers found Philadelphians were about 40 percent less likely to drink sweetened beverages daily after the tax went into effect, compared with people in the other cities.At the same time, Philadelphians’ consumption of bottled water, which is not taxed, increased. The findings are published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.”The Philadelphia beverage tax is one of the largest beverage taxes implemented in the U.S. so far,” says Yichen Zhong, the study’s lead author and a doctor student in epidemiology at Drexel. She says the reduction in consumption of taxed beverages was not a surprise.But, interestingly, the tax didn’t seem to influence consumption of sugary fruit drinks such as fruit flavors of Snapple or Sunny Delight. “It may have something to do with the perception of fruit beverages being healthier than sugared soda, despite the fact that they contain similar amount of added sugar,” Zhong told us by email.In January 2017, Philadelphia put in place the controversial tax on sweetened drinks, including sodas and diet sodas. (Diet sodas are calorie-free, but some studies suggest they may not help people manage their weight).Public health advocates argue the tax may help encourage healthy diets and help tackle obesity and Type 2 diabetes. However, the beverage industry has been engaged in a legal battle to overturn it. An industry funded group, Ax The Bev Tax, argues that the beverage tax has shifted shopping habits to the suburbs of Philadelphia so people can avoid the tax. The industry points to a 14 percent increase in beverage sales in nearby suburbs.It’s not clear whether a decline in consumption of sweetened drinks linked to the tax will lead to any measurable health benefit. “It will take much longer to observe an impact on health outcomes,” says Zhong. “Many other factors, such as beverage substitutions and overall diet quality, need to be evaluated” as well.But the study does offer evidence that the tax can help nudge behaviors. Berkeley implemented a similar tax in 2015, and as we’ve reported, one study found consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages declined — at least in some neighborhoods — by about 20 percent.Last year, several other cities enacted beverage taxes — Albany, Calif., Oakland, Calif., and Boulder, Colo. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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Children and adolescents are getting fewer prescri

first_imgChildren and adolescents are getting fewer prescription drugs than they did in years past, according to a study that looks at a cross-section of the American population.”The decrease in antibiotic use is really what’s driving this overall decline in prescription medication use that we’re seeing in children and adolescents,” says Craig Hales, a preventive medicine physician at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics and lead author of a study published Tuesday in JAMA.Hales says that’s a good thing. “Thirty percent of antibiotic prescriptions are unnecessary and potentially dangerous,” he says. They’re often given for colds and other viral infections, where they are useless. And they may have side effects. Antibiotic overuse also increases the risk that these drugs lose their curative powers.The study is based on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Study, which included more than 38,000 children and adolescents. The study compared prescription drug use from 1999 to 2002 with prescriptions given in 2011 to 2014, the last period for which data were available.Overall, the proportion of children and teenagers getting prescriptions dropped from about 25 percent to 22 percent. Prescriptions for some drugs increased, such as for treatments for asthma, contraception and attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).The survey also noted a large gap in prescription use among children and adolescents who were insured versus those who weren’t. Some 23 percent of insured youth had recently taken a prescription of some sort, compared with 10 percent of those who were uninsured.It’s hard to know how exactly to interpret many of the findings, says Gary Freed, a pediatrician and researcher at the University of Michigan Medical School, who was not involved with the research. That gap could be a sign of overuse among the insured or underuse in the uninsured.”It’s very common for people who don’t need things but want to pay for them, to be able to get them,” Freed says. “It’s also possible that some children who really need medications, if they’re uninsured, don’t get them.”The study doesn’t provide information that can address key questions like that.For example, antihistamines are widely overused or inappropriately used in children, Freed says. The study shows a decline in prescriptions for antihistamines, but that may simply be because many of these drugs came available without a prescription during the study period.”So the fact that the prescribing went down may mean something good or it may simply mean that people are going to the drugstore and buying those same medications,” Freed says.Freed says he can’t even say whether the overall use of prescription drugs in children and teen-agers, at 22 percent in a typical 30-day period, is a sign of overuse or underuse.”The danger is thinking ‘oh my goodness that’s so many kids getting medications,’ ” he says. “But at the same time, before we make that conclusion we have to know whether those were appropriate or not appropriate.”More children than ever are alive today because they’ve survived diseases that require medical treatment, he notes. Yet certain drugs are still overused. And in other instances, such as ADHD drugs, there’s disagreement about when treatment is appropriate.Those questions require more directed – and more expensive – studies. Hales hopes that his broad-brush findings will stimulate that further research.You can contact Richard Harris at rharris@npr.org. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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For six years now life has been really good for J

first_imgFor six years now, life has been really good for James. He has a great job as the creative director of an advertising firm in New York City. He enjoys spending time with his wife and kids.And it has all been possible, he says, because for the past six years he has been taking a drug called ketamine.Before ketamine, James was unable to work or focus his thoughts. His mind was filled with violent images. And his mood could go from ebullient to dark in a matter of minutes.Ketamine “helped me get my life back,” says James, who asked that we not use his last name to protect his career.Ketamine was developed as a human and animal anesthetic in the 1960s. And almost from the time it reached the market it has also been used as a mind-bending party drug.But ketamine’s story took a surprising turn in 2006, when researchers at the National Institutes of Health showed that an intravenous dose could relieve severe depression in a matter of hours. Since then, doctors have prescribed ketamine “off label” to thousands of depressed patients who don’t respond to other drugs.And pharmaceutical companies are testing several new ketamine-related drugs to treat depression. Johnson & Johnson expects to seek approval for its nasal spray esketamine later this year, though the approval would be limited to use in a clinical setting.Meanwhile, doctors have begun trying ketamine on patients with a wide range of psychiatric disorders other than depression. And there is now growing evidence it can help people with anxiety, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and perhaps even obsessive-compulsive disorder.”I think it’s actually one of the biggest advances in psychiatry in a very long time,” says Dr. Martin Teicher, an associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and director of the Developmental Biopsychiatry Research Program at McLean Hospital.Ketamine may also offer new hope for people like James who have symptoms of several different psychiatric disorders.James had a happy childhood, he says. But his thoughts were out of control. “I always felt like I was crossing a freeway and my thoughts were just racing past me,” he says.He spent much of his childhood terrified of “an unknown, an ambiguous force out there.” The fear was “overwhelming,” he says. “I literally slept with the cover over my head with just room to breathe through my mouth until I went to college.”And there was something else about James: his body temperature.”I overheated constantly,” he says. “I would wear shorts all year long. In my 20s in my apartment I would sleep with the windows open in the middle of the winter.”In his late 20s, James saw a doctor who told him he had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. So he started taking stimulants.At first, the pills helped him focus. Then they didn’t, no matter how many he took.He’d done well as an idea guy in the advertising industry. But now James was trying to work at home, and it wasn’t going well.”ADHD pills will make you interested in anything,” he says. “So I was putting the desk together and taking the desk apart. I was putting a laptop stand together and taking it apart. I was going in a massive downward spiral.”James had always suffered from mood swings. But now they were rapid and extreme. And he couldn’t stop thinking about gruesome scenarios, like a murderer coming for his family.”My wife took a summer off to be with me because she was scared of what was going to happen to me,” he says. “She would go to work for a few hours, then rush home. There would be times I’d call her just screaming, ‘Please come home. I can’t get through another minute.’ “Eventually, James found his way to Dr. Demitri Papolos, an associate professor of clinical psychiatry at Albert Einstein College of Medicine.”He was like a whirling dervish when he came into my office,” Papolos says. “He was extremely fearful and scanning the environment all the time and he overheated at the drop of a hat.”Papolos diagnosed James with a variant of bipolar disorder he calls the “fear of harm phenotype.” It typically appears in childhood and often doesn’t respond to traditional psychiatric drugs.But Papolos has found that the condition does respond to ketamine. “It’s been transformational,” he says.In January, Papolos published a study of 45 children with the problem. They inhaled a nasal mist containing ketamine about twice a week. Nearly all got dramatically better.Scientists still aren’t sure why ketamine works, but there’s evidence that it encourages the brain to rewire, to alter the connections between cells. That process has been linked to recovery from depression. And it may also explain why ketamine helps people who have symptoms associated with several different psychiatric disorders.”I think it’s having multiple effects, and that means it’s probably useful for multiple different disorders,” Teicher says.One of those effects involves a part of the brain involved in temperature regulation. And that could explain why patients like James usually stop overheating once they are taking ketamine.James started taking a ketamine nasal spray every other day. He says his response was dramatic.”One day I turn to my wife and I’m like, ‘I feel calm today. I don’t know if it’s the sun coming in, I don’t know if it’s just the way we’re sitting here, but I feel like I could go and sit at the computer and work.’ “The next day, James did sit down at his computer. A month later, he was back at work. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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Charlottes school system has completed tests for

first_imgCharlotte’s school system has completed tests for unsafe levels of lead in about half of the district’s schools.  Tests show water fixtures at 41 of Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s 89 oldest schools had unsafe levels of lead. Officials say those fixtures were removed, blocked off or filtered as soon as the high levels were detected.The Charlotte Observer reports the school system has completed a second round of testing to identify drinking fountains and other school water sources leaching unsafe levels of lead.Most of the more than 3,000 fixtures tested within safe levels. The two rounds of testing have covered just over half the district’s 175 schools. The schools that haven’t yet been tested were generally built after Congress banned lead in water pipes, fixtures and solder in 1986.Lead is toxic, especially for young children and pregnant women.last_img read more

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LATEST STORIES

first_imgLATEST STORIES Painters refuse to go quietly Locsin wants to drop ‘visas upon arrival’ privilege Water supply won’t be a problem with three tanks that can store up to 1,000 liters each and two bigger tanks for 4,000 liters.Cooking can be done in a roofed, six-meter vacant space.Mayor Rama, Councilor Dave Tumulak and DSWS Head Ester Concha led the opening rites.At about 7 a.m., an initial 20 families of evacuees in barangay Tinago gym boarded a Kaohsiung bus to attend the opening activity.Marichu Guevarra, 47, said she was thankful for the venue but worried about the heat’s effect on her grandson, a toddler.“Di man sab ko ganahan mo reklamo no, pero init lang gyud, unya ang bata ba.” (I don’t want to complain, but I’m worried about the child.)Samuel Baquilod, 53, from Leyte, also noted the mud under the tents.He said he was seriously thinking of just using his pension to rent a room in the city for his wife and three children.Baquilod is waiting for test result for a cyst in his left arm. The report from the Vicente Sotto Medical Center will be released on Jan. 7, 2014 yet.Window flaps in the tent can be opened. MOST READ While many said they worried about the heat of the open field and enclosed tents, and the distance from jeepney routes, a number visited the site in the South Road Properties (SRP), ready to give it a try.“Init kaayo murag deserto,” said 51-year-old Marcial Cagabhion. (It’s so hot it’s like a desert.)FEATURED STORIESNEWSINFOSenate to probe Tolentino’s ‘novel legal theories’ on oral agreementsNEWSINFOLocsin wants to drop ‘visas upon arrival’ privilegeNEWSINFOPalace open to make Dengvaxia usable again as dengue cases spikeFederico Tabay, a survivor from Tanauan, Leyte, who came with his two todder sons, isn’t complaining.“Okay ra man kapuy-an diri, bisan ug init, at least maka antos ra man. Ka antos man gani ta’s bagyo.” (It’s all right to stay here even if it’s hot. We can cope. We’ve managed to survive the typhoon.) Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Cebu City Mayor Michael Rama yesterday led the opening of Tent City for typhoon evacuees, saying the city and Red Cross were “opening a place of love, a place of caring, a place of serving.”By Monday, December 23, the remaining 38 families staying at the Tinago barangay gym will be taken there except for those who have scheduled trips back to hometowns in Leyte and were allowed to stay longer in the gym.ADVERTISEMENT PBA: Rain or Shine overcomes San Miguel, McCullough’s 51 to avert sweep Senate to probe Tolentino’s ‘novel legal theories’ on oral agreementscenter_img PH protests Chinese boat swarm, warship passage Baybayin revival makes native PH history hip View comments PCSO to focus on improving transparency of gaming activities PLAY LIST 03:26PCSO to focus on improving transparency of gaming activities01:39Sotto open to discuss, listen to pros and cons of divorce bill06:02Senate to probe Tolentino’s ‘novel legal theories’ on oral agreements01:50Palace open to make Dengvaxia usable again as dengue cases spike01:49House seeks probe on ‘massive corruption’ in PCSO01:37PCSO estimates P250M in Lotto revenue loss due to suspension Palace open to make Dengvaxia usable again as dengue cases spike SRP Manager Varquez who entered one tent noted that it was made of synthetic material suitable for summer.To address the distance from public transport, a multicab will shuttle between SRP and City Hall at regular intervals from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m., said Jocelyng Pesquera, head of the Tent City committee.Meals will be served by the city government and private sponsors.To keep the evacuees busy, “skills training sesisons” will be offered by private sponsor groups for construction, plumbing, carpentry, welding and masonry, said officials. Lessons in cooking, bead works and massage will also be given.Policemen will guard the site and visitors have to log in for secuirty. Red Cross personnel are on call 24/7 to extend assistance.There were concerns and complaints, but in the end, evacuees have little choice.Asked how long he thinks evacuees should stay in the Tent City, Mayor Rama said that was the wrong perspective.“The question shouldn’t be how long can they stay here but how soon can we bring them back (to their homes)?” He said that as long as the evacuees “cooperate” and respond well, things will get better. /Bjorn Abraham Tabanera, CorrespondentRead Next WHAT WENT BEFORE: Dengvaxia is world’s first dengue vaccine Of 60 tents mounted in rows, one is a makeshift office while another is used as a clinic.MORE STORIESnewsinfoWHAT WENT BEFORE: Dengvaxia is world’s first dengue vaccinenewsinfoBaybayin revival makes native PH history hipnewsinfoMartial law in Negros? Military taking cue from local execsMORE STORIESnewsinfoWHAT WENT BEFORE: Dengvaxia is world’s first dengue vaccinenewsinfoBaybayin revival makes native PH history hipnewsinfoMartial law in Negros? Military taking cue from local execsEach tent has two sections, a solar-powered lamp and six zipper-openings. Each tent can accommodate up to 10 people.Pillows and mattresses will be provided said SRP Manager Roberto Varquez.The 1.3 hectare camp site, officially called the SRP Family Rebuilding Center, opened with a Mass and blessing rites.Behind the tent clusters are eight bathroom cubicles.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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Prepared by FFWPU USA On March 3 four participant

first_imgPrepared by FFWPU USAOn March 3, four participants gathered at the International Peace Education Center (IPEC) in Las Vegas to attend the latest of Rev. Andrew Compton’s True Love Divine Principle seminars. The weekend proved to be a meaningful experience for both old and new students of the Divine Principle. Melisha, someone learning about the Divine Principle for the first time, proved a great asset to the group thanks to her fresh perspective. “She had lots of questions… and left very excited,” commented Rev. Compton.Others were grateful for the cozy, tight-knit atmosphere of the seminar. “Because there were only four participants there was ample time for questions and reflections,” says Bruce Sutchar, a Chicago participant who came eager for one-on-one time with Rev. Compton, a renowned lecturer.Rev. Compton recommends that those who enjoyed the True Love Divine Principle Seminar but still have questions come back to attend its seven-day companion seminar, also offered monthly at IPEC.For more details about upcoming workshops and to registerlast_img read more

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