Four militants killed in Rajouri district

first_imgFour militants were killed in the Pir Panchal Valley in Rajouri district on Wednesday after they fired at the security forces.“Four militants were killed in a fierce gunfight in the Sunderbani area of Rajouri. This group recently infiltrated from the Line of Control,” Director-General of Police S.P. Vaid said.A police official said the operation was launched on a tip-off. The militants hiding in the bushes fired upon the search party. They then hid at Ravarian Talla village, 1 km from the Sunderbani township. Senior Superintendent of Police, Rajouri, Yougal Manhas said the forces had recovered bags containing ammunition and explosives.The presence of militants forced the authorities in Rajouri to close down schools.Firing in PulwamaA brief exchange of fire was reported between militants and security forces in the Littar of Pulwama, the police said.Governor N.N. Vohra, who visited Srinagar on Wednesday, had extensive discussions with Dineshwar Sharma, Special Representative of the Union government.last_img read more

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Cyclone Fani: Naveen Patnaik seeks more kerosene for Odisha

first_imgWith the task of restoring power supply in the worst-hit parts of Odisha taking longer than anticipated, Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik has asked the Centre to urgently allocate an additional 1,000 kilolitres (KL) of kerosene oil for the State.“Though restoration works are in progress on war footing, but due to the extensive damage caused to the power infrastructure, supply of electricity will take some more time,” Mr. Patnaik wrote in a letter addressed to Union Petroleum and Natural Gas Minister Dharmendra Pradhan on Friday. “Absence of electricity has led to a surge in demand for kerosene oil,” he added.Mr. Patnaik sought immediate allotment of the oil so that the same could be distributed from the month of May.“As a special case, this stock may be provided to the wholesalers by oil companies free-of-cost so that we can distribute it to the affected people without any charge,” he suggested.Earlier, emphasising the need to provide adequate supplies of the fuel, Civil Society Responds to Fani (CSRF), an umbrella grouping of NGOs, said given the widespread disruption to power supply, residents were facing acute hardship as kerosene oil had not been supplied as a part of the relief material.“Cyclone affected people have to pay ₹35 per litre of kerosene from fair price shops and much higher in the black market,” said Manas Ranjan Mishra, a member of the CSRF. “Supply of at least one litre of kerosene, free of cost as relief, in addition to PDS quota should be ensured,” he added.The CSRF urged the State government to expedite restoration work so that people could get relief from scorching heat. It also emphasised the need to ensure comprehensive rehabilitation of the affected people so that they could quickly get back on their feet.Meanwhile, Chief Secretary A. P. Padhi joined the National Crisis Committee meeting held under the chairmanship of Cabinet Secretary P. K. Sinha on Friday. A roadmap has been drawn up to restore electric supply expeditiously.“More gangs have reached Odisha,” officials in the chief secretary’s office said. “Materials have also been moved. Restoration of power has been expedited. As of today around 50% of consumers in Bhubaneswar have got power.” Similarly, there has been substantial improvement in telecommunications connectivity. The Base Transmission Station radiation has increased to 42% in Khurdha, 14% in Puri and 54% in Cuttack districts. It is 39% in Bhubaneswar city and 54% in Cuttack city.last_img read more

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Want a grant? First review someone else’s proposal

first_imgAfter 32 years as a program officer at the National Science Foundation (NSF), George Hazelrigg knows the rules governing peer review, especially the one that says researchers can’t be both an applicant and a reviewer in the same funding competition. Last year, however, he got permission to throw the rules out the window. His experiment, aimed at easing the strain on NSF staff and reviewers produced by a burgeoning number of proposals and declining success rates, not only allowed applicants to serve as reviewers, but it also required them to assess seven competing proposals in exchange for having their own application reviewed.Some scientists might be horrified by such a “pay to play” system. But researchers in the engineering systems community responded enthusiastically, submitting 60% more proposals than usual by the 1 October deadline. A preliminary NSF evaluation concluded that the process, which used mail reviews rather than the in-person panels that are the norm at NSF, not only saved time and money but may also have improved the quality of the proposals and the reviews.NSF is now considering whether to expand use of the offbeat approach, which is based in part on NSF-funded research into better voting and decision-making systems. In the meantime, some astronomers have already jumped on the bandwagon: Faced with a similar reviewing crunch, in January the Gemini Observatory will begin using a similar system to allocate observing time on its Hawaii telescope. “Finding good reviewers willing to spend the time is getting harder and harder,” says Rachel Mason, a Gemini astronomer in Hawaii who is coordinating the experiment, called Fast-Turnaround. “People also thought it would be kinda fun to have the chance to read their competitors’ proposals.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The core problem is familiar to every science administrator. A system that relies upon the willingness of the scientific community to volunteer its time is being stretched to its limits as the number of applications goes up and the chances of success go down. NSF received 49,000 proposals last year, up 53% from 2001. Its budget didn’t keep up, meaning that success rates fell from 31% to 22% over the same period. Those trends have created two, related problems: The cost of peer review, in time and money, is rising at the same time more scientists are complaining about having to spend valuable time reviewing good ideas that have little chance of being funded.Rather than wring his hands, however, Hazelrigg went looking for an alternative that avoided one easy answer, namely, limiting the number of submissions. “I didn’t want to put restrictions on the principal investigators,” he says.Instead, Hazelrigg found inspiration in a 2009 paper in Astronomy & Geophysics, titled “Telescope time without tears: a distributed approach to peer review.” The paper was prompted, says co-author Michael Merrifield, an astronomer at the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom, by a “bulging file of 113 applications” on his desk for observing time on instruments operated by the European Southern Observatory (ESO)—far more than he had the time or inclination to evaluate. The review system, he says, was “groaning at the seams.”So Merrifield teamed up with mathematician Donald Saari of the University of California, Irvine, who has written extensively about voting systems, to suggest what Merrifield acknowledges is a “radical alternative.” The idea, rooted in mathematical game theory, is to alter the rules in ways that bring the competition closer to achieving its goals.In NSF’s case, that meant distributing the evaluation workload more equitably and providing reviewers with a positive incentive to do a good job. The agency calls its approach mechanism design, and it begins by having grant applicants agree to review seven proposals submitted by their competitors. In addition to grading each one, using NSF’s five-point system from excellent to poor, they also ranked their set of proposals from best to worst. Hazelrigg says he chose seven “to discourage scientists from being frivolous” in submitting half-baked proposals, because each submission meant a commitment to doing seven reviews. At the same time, he felt that scientists would balk if he set the bar too high.Hazelrigg, who heads NSF’s Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI) Division, says it took more than a year for the agency to approve the pilot. It was announced in May 2013 in a “Dear Colleague” letter to prospective applicants to a program funding research on sensors and sensing systems. Anyone wanting to submit to the October 2013 competition would have to abide by the rules, the letter said, but those who didn’t like the idea could simply wait until the next deadline, in mid-February.The community’s initial reaction was generally positive, Hazelrigg recalls, but he knew the real test would be the tally of submissions. To his surprise and delight, NSF received 131 applications, some 50 more than the norm for a fall deadline.The decision to participate in the experiment was a no-brainer for Rolf Mueller, a bioengineer at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg. “I understood that I was agreeing to do a bunch of reviews, but that didn’t affect my decision,” he says. “And it was interesting to see some of the other proposals.” (NSF ultimately agreed to give him $360,000 over 3 years to apply aspects of a bat’s biosonar system to improve humanmade radar and sonar systems. Click here to see a video of a 3D reconstruction of a cave in Jinan, China, where Mueller is studying bats.)Another applicant, electrical engineer Arash Takshi of the University of South Florida, Tampa, says the ability to see what his competitors were doing “filled a blind spot for me. Now I know that if I don’t get funded, it’s because of the quality of the other proposals, not something I did wrong.” (His proposal, to develop a more sensitive optical sensor using photosynthetic proteins rather than silicon-based elements, was also funded—his first NSF grant.) Takshi regards the estimated 30 hours he spent doing his required seven reviews as fulfilling part of his duties as an academic researcher.NSF officials say they have a hunch the pilot led to “more comprehensive reviews.” Each proposal received seven reviews rather than the normal three or four, Hazelrigg notes. “And each review had, on average, 40% more words. I’m not saying that more is better, but we found the overall quality to be at least comparable” to reviews by panels, which review about 60% of all applications (see graphic, below). (Only one entrant, he notes, was disqualified, for failing to meet the 6-week deadline for submitting the reviews.)One novel aspect of the pilot was its scoring system. Reviewers whose ranking of the seven proposals closely matched what the six other reviewers thought received bonus points that were applied to their own application. The idea was to reward reviewers for taking the job seriously and dissuade them from unfairly denigrating a competitor’s proposal in hopes of giving themselves a leg up. Using such a tactic would presumably prevent them from receiving a bonus because it would cause their ranking to be out of step with their colleagues.Using applicants as reviewers also saved NSF time and money, Hazelrigg says. It takes a program manager 2 to 3 weeks to assemble an on-site review panel, he estimates, a process that starts with identifying some 400 potential reviewers before winnowing the group down to the typical 16- to 20-member panel. The use of mail reviews also meant that NSF didn’t need to provide travel and per diem expenses to bring those reviewers to NSF headquarters in Arlington, Virginia, to vet a stack of proposals. “Our division runs 200 panels a year,” he says, “so that’s a big cost savings.”As with every merit review system, however, the pilot has some potential downsides. One NSF program manager who asked to remain anonymous worries that the bonus system could discourage innovative ideas that some reviewers might regard as poor bets. “It rewards people for playing it safe,” the program manager says, referring to how applicants might be reluctant to submit a disruptive idea that’s likely to get a mixed reaction from reviewers. “But it’s the outliers who are most likely to come up with the breakthrough.” Hazelrigg plays down that possibility, noting that program managers are not bound by the judgments of reviewers and have the flexibility to recommend a proposal for funding even if it doesn’t receive one of the top scores.The skeptical program manager also worries that mail reviews make it impossible to hold a face-to-face discussion about the quality of both the proposed science and its broader impacts, the two criteria upon which every NSF proposal is judged. “We need that dialogue to explore all aspects of a proposal,” the manager says.Mueller and Takshi, however, believe that personal interaction can also have a downside. “Having an argument is a good thing, but sometimes people who are more assertive can carry the day,” Mueller says.NSF officials are still evaluating whether to expand the CMMI pilot, one of seven experiments the agency ran last year that tinkered with the normal merit review process. One option, to allow virtual reviews, turned out to be a real hit: Some 28% of all NSF panels last year met in cyberspace, a far cry from NSF’s goal of 5%. NSF officials suspect a crackdown on travel costs by the White House contributed to its popularity. Individual NSF programs also tested the impact on the number of applications by switching from two competition cycles per year to one or by accepting proposals at any time rather than setting a deadline. Another pilot offered reviewers the convenience of asynchronous discussions in cyberspace via a moderated message board.The community’s reaction to such ideas will play a major role in whether NSF adopts any of the tweaks. One group of astronomers, however, has already embraced a version of the distributed reviewer concept detailed in the 2009 “tears” paper that also inspired Hazelrigg.ESO did not adopt the scheme suggested by the authors, Merrifield and Saari. But after a senior ESO scientist, Markus Kissler-Patig, become director of the Gemini Observatory, an international consortium that operates twin 8-meter telescopes in Hawaii and Chile, he asked his staff to consider the approach. After much discussion, the observatory decided to use applicants as reviewers to allocate 10% of the viewing time on Hawaii’s Gemini North, starting in January.“We could probably find a group of generous reviewers willing to donate their time,” says Gemini’s Mason. “But the problem is only going to get worse as the workload grows. And if it works, we can expand it to Gemini South.” Without such changes, she predicts, “the existing system is simply going to break down.”last_img read more

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Assam bodies weigh legal options against CAB

first_imgIndividuals and organisations batting for the interest of indigenous groups in the northeastern States are weighing legal options against the “communal and unconstitutional” Citizenship (Amendment) Bill, or CAB, that the Centre proposes to reintroduce in Parliament.The Bill seeks to fast-track the process of granting citizenship to non-Muslims who have allegedly fled religious persecution in Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Pakistan.Protests across the northeastern States, specifically Assam which fears of being dumped with non-Muslim refugees from Bangladesh, have intensified since November 18 when the winter session of Parliament began. Most of these protests have been coordinated by the North East Students’ Organisation. The Assam-based Krishak Mukti Sangram Samiti, a peasants’ body, has also been spearheading a parallel protesting. Former teacher and activist Hiren Gohain, aligned with this organisation, said during an anti-CAB demonstration that it might not be enough to just hit the streets against the “divisive and communal” Bill. “The BJP and its allies enjoy the majority and can have the CAB passed in both Houses of Parliament. But we have the window of challenging any discriminatory legislation in the Supreme Court,” he said.BJP leaders in the northeast have also been wary of repercussions if the Bill is passed. While the Meghalaya unit of the Party has asked the Centre to keep the State out of the Bill’s purview, pressure is mounting on the party’s Assam unit to discuss the issue in the Assembly, whose winter session starts on November 28.“The Meghalaya Assembly had taken a resolution against CAB. The BJP government in Arunachal Pradesh has also voiced its opposition to the Bill. We should also discuss the issue in the House,” said a BJP legislator, declining to be quoted.last_img read more

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YC activists arrested for trying to show black flags to PM

first_imgKolkata, Feb 21 (PTI) Around 35 Youth Congress activists were arrested for trying to show black flags to Prime Minister Narendra Modi who visited the city this evening to launch the centenary celebrations of Gaudiya Mission and Math, police said.Around 5 PM, the Youth Congress activists gathered near Netaji Indoor Stadium, the venue of the event, and started waving black flags when a fleet of cars was approaching the place, they said.The Youth Congress activities were protesting against the ongoing JNU controversy, a Congress party leader said.”The activists mistook the fleet of cars with that of the PM and they started waving black flags and raised Modi go back slogans. We did not take any chance and immediately arrested them,” a senior officer of Kolkata Police said.Modi reached the venue around 7 PM after reaching the Netaji Subhas Chandra International Airport at around 5.55 PM.The Prime Minister was received at the airport by Governor K N Tripathi, state minister for urban development Firhad Hakim and state power minister Manish Gupta. PTI SCH DKB SMNlast_img read more

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TI: robust, noise-immune capacitive-sensing MCUs with CapTIvate technology

first_img Continue Reading Previous b-plus: lossless decoupling of raw data with time-stampsNext Kontron and NXP collaborate on edge computing for the IIoT Bringing capacitive-sensing capabilities to cost-sensitive applications, Texas Instruments announced an expansion of its MSP430 microcontroller family with CapTIvate technology. Developers can use the new MSP430FR2512 and MSP430FR2522 MCUs with integrated capacitive touch to add as many as 16 buttons as well as proximity sensing capability to industrial systems, home automation systems, appliances, power tools, home entertainment, personal audio applications and more.The MSP430FR2512 and MSP430FR2522 MCUs deliver International Electrotechnical Commission 61000-4-6-certified capacitive sensing MCU-based solutions for applications exposed to electromagnetic disturbances, oil, water and grease. The new MCUs offer five times lower power consumption than the competition, supporting proximity sensing and touch through glass, plastic and metal overlays.TI’s CapTIvate technology adds the benefits of capacitive touch and proximity sensing to applications such as access control panels, cooktops, wireless speakers and power tools. Developers can quickly evaluate capacitive sensing for their applications with the new BOOSTXL-CAPKEYPAD BoosterPack plug-in module that is compatible with the CapTIvate programmer board (CAPTIVATE-PGMR) or TI LaunchPad development kits. The BoosterPack module joins a portfolio of MCUs, easy-to-use tools, software, reference designs and documentation in the CapTIvate Design Center and online CapTIvate technology guide. In addition, developers can find answers and support in the TI E2E Community to speed development with CapTIvate technology.Production quantities of the MSP430FR2512 and MSP430FR2522 MCUs are available in a 20-pin VQFN package and a 16-pin TSSOP package.Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: Chips & Components last_img read more

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Dutee bags second medal, wins 200m silver

first_imgBy Amanpreet Singh Jakarta, Aug 29 (PTI) Dutee Chand today joined her illustrious compatriots such as P T Usha in the list of athletes who have won more than one medal at the Asian Games as she added a silver to her kitty after finishing second earlier in the women’s 100m dash here today. She crossed the finishing line in 23.20 seconds, behind Bahrain’s Edidiong Odiong who clinched the gold in 22.96. The bronze went to China’s Wei Yongli (23.27). It has been an outstanding show by the 22-year-old Odisha sprinter who was not allowed to compete in 2014-15 under the IAAF’s hyperandrogenism policy due to which she missed the 2014 Commonwealth and Asian Games. She fought and won a case against this policy at the Court of Arbitration for Sports. In a recent revision of the hyperandrogenism policy of the IAAF, Dutee has been left out of its purview. Legendary Usha had swept four gold medals at the 1986 Seoul Asian Games, winning 200m, 400m, 400m hurdles and 4x400m relay. Jyotirmoyee Sikdar, (800m 1500m) had also won two medals at the at 1998 Bangkok Games. Sunita Rani (1500m, 5000m ) also returned with two medals from the 2002 Busan Games. PTI AT PDSPDSlast_img read more

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Bizarre boxing ring walks, goalscoring proposals and Courtney Walsh’s best

first_img4) Courtney Walsh turned 56 this week so why not enjoy the West Indies great taking 5-1 against Sri Lanka at an ODI in Sharjah in 1986, England’s Robin Smith forced to take cover from three brutal bouncers in Antigua in 1990, all 17 of his dismissals of Mike Atherton plus a hat-trick at The Gabba from 1988. Never a natural batsman, he was in even more uncomfortable surroundings as he tried to play through the laughter at the SCG, with Colin Miller’s blue hair proving a distraction. Bonus feature: partner in crime Curtley Ambrose bamboozling Sachin Tendulkar at the World Cup in 1992.5) Klay Thompson broke Golden State Warriors’ teammate Steph Curry’s record for most three-pointers in a game this week, with a monster 14 treys against the Chicago Bulls on Monday night. Revisit their epic 3-point contests from All-Star weekend at Brooklyn in 2015 and Toronto, 2016.6) Volgar Astrakhan’s Roman Loktionov scores a spookily identical goal to one he scored against the same team, in the same minute, in the same stadium, seven years ago.Our favourites from last week’s blog1) Sprintcar driver Kelly Linigen taking her steering wheel home after being disqualified from a race for dangerous driving.2) More Azhar Ali-related run out fun with Ian Bell v India in 2011 and Tony Greig’s outstanding services to cricketing headwear as he slams the ball down the non-striker’s end against West Indies in 1974.3) And this is exceptional but, for those of a nervous disposition, don’t click on this link of Surrey’s own Brendan Fairclough’s helmet cam as he descends down a mountainside in Utah on a pushbike at the Red Bull Rampage. Pinterest Share on Messenger Do look down: Brendan Fairclough in Utah. Spotters badges: GrahamClayton, Peter Evans and fi5ty5iveGuardian YouTube football channelDo subscribe if you fancy.Guardian YouTube sport channelDo subscribe if you fancy. Topics Facebook Share on LinkedIn Sport Share via Email Support The Guardian South Shields FC (@SouthShieldsFC)Goal of the season?! We’ll let you decide!What a stunning goal from David Foley today – here it is!https://t.co/6L53zpLtfXOctober 27, 2018 Share on Pinterest Share on WhatsApp Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Twitter … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay. Whether we are up close or further away, the Guardian brings our readers a global perspective on the most critical issues of our lifetimes – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. We believe complex stories need context in order for us to truly understand them. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. 1) Inspired by Regis Prograis, the New Orleans-based light welterweight who walks out to his fights in this get-up, here’s Ghana’s Joseph ‘King Kong’ Agbeko dressed as … you guessed it … for his bout with Yonnhy Pérez in 2009; Sharif ‘The Lion’ Bogere really does live and breathe his moniker; Australia’s Michael ‘The Great’ Katsidis as a Spartan Warrior; Héctor ‘Macho’ Camacho being, well, macho before ending Sugar Ray Leonard’s glorious career; Bernard Hopkins’s transformation over the years from ‘The Executioner’ to ‘The Alien’; and then, of course, there’s dear old ‘Rickie Fatton’ from 2008.2) Romantic scenes in the Chilean Primera División as Antofagasta midfielder Eduard Bello got down on bended knee to propose to girlfriend Gabriela Brito … after scoring … and had some not-so sweet nothings whispered into his ear from the referee, plus a yellow card. Meanwhile, in the NBA, Dallas Mavericks’ fan Keith Houseworth whipped a ring out for girlfriend Panda Green only to have their touching moment on live television somewhat overshadowed by the bloke in the background.3) Like overhead kicks? Then love David Foley of South Shields. features Since you’re here… YouTube archive Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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New Brunswick town stakes claim to worlds oldest basketball court

first_imgST. STEPHEN, N.B. – For years, it lay hidden under drab blue carpet on the top floor of a non-descript building that housed everything from a printing press and dance hall to a gym and storeroom.But in 2010 when a fire swept through the historic structure in St. Stephen, N.B., the cleanup uncovered a buried treasure that’s now at the centre of a transatlantic debate over a little-known piece of basketball lore.“Upstairs there was carpet all over the gymnasium floor and pulling up the carpet, by God there it was — all hardwood,” said Peter Corby, president of the non-profit group Canada 1st Basketball Inc.“And that’s the forgotten floor.”The floor is what Corby and other self-proclaimed Canadian “basketball nuts” claim is the oldest basketball court in the world and where research suggests the first game was played on Oct. 17, 1893.The assertion has touched off an international tug-of-war with historians who say Paris has the oldest basketball court still in use. It was there, in the basement of a Parisian YMCA, that a game of hoops was played in December of 1893, just a couple of years after the game was invented.Corby, a former athletic director and teacher who’s heading a group hoping to preserve the New Brunswick court, insists that the St. Stephen YMCA game was played months earlier, giving lie to the Paris claim.“I guess Donald Trump would call that fake news!” he joked in an interview from his home in Fredericton.“We were playing basketball months before their claim. We’ve researched it and researched it with our local newspapers and the YMCA …. Our date is way before their date.”Corby traces the story of the floor back to one of the original players of the game, Lyman Archibald, a Canadian who studied at the YMCA Training School in Massachusetts under James Naismith — basketball’s inventor.According to Historica Canada, Naismith was looking for an indoor recreational sport when he was teaching at the YMCA in Springfield and came up with a game that used peach baskets, a ball and 13 rules governing such things as running with the ball, tripping and pushing.Many of his students returned to Canada, helping spread the game across the country.In St. Stephen, the game took hold when Archibald, who was originally from Nova Scotia, was assigned to be the director of the local YMCA where he introduced the small community to basketball. Corby says it inspired a passion for the game that is still felt in the town of about 4,600 people.That enduring enthusiasm led Corby and his group to work with the current owner of the building, the St. Croix Vocational Centre, to figure out a way that Canada 1st Basketball could buy it and turn it into a basketball heritage museum.Under the arrangement, Corby has just under two years to raise enough money to buy the building for an amount that has yet to be determined.The work is part of a dream for Corby and his group to celebrate both the game and Canada’s critical role in its beginnings, much like Cooperstown, N.Y., has done with its National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.“There is no physical building in Canada that houses a Canadian basketball hall of fame,” he said, adding that there will be a special event on Oct. 17 to commemorate 125 years of basketball being played in St. Stephen.St. Stephen Mayor Allan MacEachern said being in the space — a court of about 14 metres by 9.3 metres under baby blue walls and an ornate green and white ceiling — conjures up visions of what it was like a century ago when nine players per team squared off against each other.“When you get in there, you can start envisioning those guys playing ball there and you can feel it,” he said in an interview. “It does not look like a gym — it’s got a gym floor, but it’s got tin ceilings. Those are beautiful ceilings.”He’s hoping the federal government helps out with funding so Corby and his crew can transform the building into a lasting tribute to the sport.It could also be a tourist boon for the seaside town, known more for being the home of Canada’s oldest candy company, Ganong.“Basketball is huge. There are people who would want to walk on this floor or see it or play on it,” MacEachern said. “Not everyone has that opportunity to have the oldest basketball court in the world sitting in front of you!”– By Alison Auld in Halifax, with notes from Michael MacDonaldlast_img read more

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Author Bharati Mukherjee dies at age 76

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Twitter Indian author Bharati Mukherjee, part of a Canadian and American literary power couple with her husband writer Clark Blaise, died Saturday in New York at 76.Mukherjee, who was born in Kolkata, is known around the world for her books including The Middleman and Other Stories, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction, that deal with immigrant life and trying to create a new identity for oneself — something she knew well from the experience of her own life.“She was an early writer dealing with the kinds of tensions that we’re still dealing with today,” said Iris Tupholme, her editor at HarperCollins Canada. Advertisement Login/Register With:center_img “She was elegant and glamorous and dignified and determined.”Blaise also shared some of his feelings with the Star. “I find myself adopting a Hindu world view (she was not at all religious), meaning that the soul is eternal, but the external wrapping is ephemeral,” Blaise wrote in an email. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebooklast_img read more

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TSX lower amid mixed earnings from banks Fed concerns

Canadian stocks were lower Thursday, pressured by the financial sector as the latest batch of earnings from Canada’s big banks disappointed, giving traders an excuse to take some more profits from a sector that has delivered sold returns all year.The S&P/TSX composite index fell 67.21 points to 13,237.71 with extra selling pressure coming from mining stocks amid falling commodity prices.The Canadian dollar was down 0.07 of a cent to 93.58 cents US.Toronto-Dominion Bank (TSX:TD) had $1.622 billion of net income in the fourth quarter, up from $1.597 billion a year ago. On an adjusted basis, TD earned $1.90 per share, up from $1.83 in the fourth quarter of 2012 but nine cents less than analysts had expected. TD also raised its dividend by a penny to 86 cents a share and a two-for-one stock split effective early next month. Its shares fell $1.80 to $99.95.Most of TD’s major units showed increases but net income from wholesale banking fell by 61 per cent to $122 million from a year earlier, due to lower security gains and higher non-interest expenses.Royal Bank of Canada (TSX:RY) had $2.119 billion of net income in its fiscal fourth quarter, an 11 per cent increase from last year. Adjusted diluted earnings per share was $1.42, four cents higher than analysts had forecast. Its dividend remains unchanged. But its shares fell 66 cents to $68.34 as Barclays analyst John Aiken pointed to both the wealth management and retail banking divisions as performing weaker than he expected.RBC also announced that Gordon Nixon intends to retire effective Aug. 1, 2014, after 13 years as president and chief executive.CIBC (TSX:CM) made $836 million in net income in its fiscal fourth quarter, down from $852 million in the same period last year. After adjusting for one-time items, earnings were $2.22 per share, seven cents ahead of estimates and up 8.8 per cent from a year ago. Revenue of $3.2 billion fell short of estimates of $3.26 billion and its shares slipped seven cents to $89.98. A dividend increase had been expected but its dividend was unchanged .U.S. indexes were lower on concerns about what the Federal Reserve will do with a key stimulus measure grew in the wake of more positive economic data.The Dow Jones industrials lost 22.03 points to 15,867.74 amid further positive news on the U.S. jobs front a day before the release of the government’s employment report. The Labor Department reported that applications for jobless benefits, which are a proxy for layoffs, dropped 23,000 last week to 296,000.Other data out Thursday morning showed that U.S. gross domestic product for the third quarter was revised upward to an annualized rate of 3.6 per cent from 2.8 per cent.The Nasdaq declined 1.84 points to 4,036.16 and the S&P 500 index was down 3.79 points to 1,789.02. Expectations for job creation in the government employment report moved higher after payroll firm ADP reported Wednesday that the private sector added 215,000 jobs last month. Prior to that report, markets had expected job creation of about 183,000.But while a stronger report would be welcomed as another sign of an improving economy, it would also raise concerns that the Federal Reserve is getting close to cutting back on its US$85 billion of monthly bond purchases, a program that has kept long term rates low and supported a strong equity market rally this year.On the TSX, the TSX financial sector was down 0.65 per cent. The component has been a drag this week as investors were also unimpressed with earnings from Bank of Montreal (TSX:BMO) and National Bank (TSX:NA). Still, the TSX financial sector started this week up more than 20 per cent year to date. Scotiabank (TSX:BNS) posts earnings on Friday. Its shares fell 76 cents to $62.94.The gold sector fell 2.2 per cent as December bullion fell $23.10 to US$1,224.10. Goldcorp (TSX:G) fell 63 cents to $22.30.Traders also looked to Barrick Gold (TSX:ABX) a day after Peter Munk announced he will retire next year from the board of the world’s largest gold producer. Former Goldman Sachs executive John Thornton, who has shared the chairman’s duties with Munk since 2012, will be named chairman. Its shares fell 13 cents to $16.59. Munk’s departure is part of broad changes at the gold miner, including the hiring of a chief operating officer and the nomination of four new independent directors.Metals were lower as March copper declined three cents to US$3.22 a pound after the American jobs data, along strong housing and trade reports, helped push the metal up eight cents on Thursday. The base metals sector fell 0.9 per cent and HudBay Minerals gave back 14 cents to $7.70.The energy sector declined 0.3 per cent while the January crude contract on the New York Mercantile Exchange gained 33 cents to US$97.53 a barrel. Suncor Energy (TSX:SU) gave back 38 cents to $36.72.In other earnings news, Dollarama Inc. (TSX:DOL) says its third-quarter overall sales increased by 14.2 per cent to $522.9 million while comparable-store sales were up 4.8 per cent. Net income was $61.7 million, up from $51.48 million a year earlier, while diluted earnings per share for the Montreal-based discount retail chain rose to 87 cents per share from 68 cents. Its stock fell $1.60 to $85.50. read more

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Turkey UN global experts warn against criminalizing independent medical care in emergencies

“If adopted, Article 33 will have a chilling effect on the availability and accessibility of emergency medical care in a country prone to natural disasters and a democracy that is not immune from demonstrations,” UN Special Rapporteur on the right to health, Anand Grover, said in a news release.“Enacting laws and policies criminalizing provision of medical care to people challenging State authorities, such as political protestors, will certainly deter healthcare workers from providing services due to fear of prosecution,” he warned. “Sanctioning such laws and policies will also discourage other segments of the population from seeking health services due to fear of being suspected in the involvement in protests,” he added. Both Mr. Grover and the WMA have written individually to the Turkish Government expressing their grave concern about the requirements of Article 33 of the draft health bill, and called on parliamentarians to “scrap it.” WMA Secretary General Otmar Kloiber pointed out that “in times of urgency, from earthquakes to floods to protests and demonstrations, the international standards for emergency medical care are based on the medical need of the wounded and sick rather than the presence of official medical transport.” The two experts noted that international medical and human rights standards make it clear that it is a humanitarian duty of doctors, nurses, paramedics, and other health workers to give emergency care to those in need. “They must be able to carry out their professional responsibilities without interference or fear of reprisal,” they said.UN independent experts, or special rapporteurs, are appointed by the Geneva-based Human Rights Council to examine and report back on a country situation or a specific human rights theme. The positions are honorary and the experts are not UN staff, nor are they paid for their work. read more

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Gunshot fired at Kentucky State Fair leads to teens arrest

News outlets report 29-year-old Cane L. Madden was arrested Saturday on charges of first-degree rape, assault and robbery. LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) – A teen accused of firing a gunshot at the Kentucky State Fair has been arrested.News outlets report police announced Friday that a 15-year-old from Louisville has been charged with possession of a handgun by a minor and wanton endangerment. The gunshot, followed by the sound of fireworks, sent people running Saturday night at the fair.- Advertisement – Kentucky State police spokesman Josh Lawson said Tuesday that a shell casing had been found at the fairgrounds. Detectives say gun trace technology linked the casing to the gun it was fired from. Troopers say the same gun was used in a Louisville-area crime earlier this month.An 18-year-old and a 16-year-old have also been arrested and charged in the state fair incident.It’s unclear whether they had attorneys who could speak for them. read more

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Mens Hockey No 6 Ohio State closes out regular season against Wisconsin

Junior forward Mason Jobst (26) becomes a wedge between Michigan’s Quinn Hughes (43) and Dexter Dancs (90) Jan. 26, 2018 at the Schottenstein Center in Columbus, OH. Credit: Ethan Clewell | Lantern ReporterThe No. 6 Ohio State men’s hockey team will host senior weekend Friday and Saturday at the Schottenstein Center, but it will not be the last time the seniors take the ice at home. The Buckeyes have already clinched home-ice advantage in the first round of the Big Ten tournament, taking on Michigan State in a best-of-three series beginning March 2. Before it begins its journey through the conference tournament, Ohio State (19-8-5, 12-8-2-1 Big Ten) will take on Wisconsin (14-15-4, 8-11-3-1 Big Ten) for a weekend series at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday.Senior forward Matthew Weis said he knows while it will be an emotional senior weekend, it helps knowing it won’t be the last time the seniors hear the crunch of the Schott’s ice under their skates.“I think it’s good to know it’s not our final game, but I think still, for me at least, emotions will be high. My family will be in the building again. So, I think just seeing all the stuff that we do before the game for Senior Night will get me going,” Weis said. “It’s definitely nice with the format change and being able to secure home ice this year, so we’ll be able to come back to the Schott.”The Buckeyes enter the matchup following a series split against No. 8 Minnesota, losing the first contest in a narrow 2-1 defeat before tying the next game 1-1 and grabbing the extra point in the shootout. The Badgers are coming off a bye week. But in the prior week, they were buried by a combined score of 11-3 in two losses to Minnesota. “We saw Wisconsin a long time ago, the first series of the year, and the one thing I’ll say is it felt like playoff hockey, even though it was the first weekend of the year,” head coach Steve Rohlik said. “I don’t expect anything different.” Wisconsin has been hovering around a .500 record the entire season and has continued that trend in recent weeks, going 4-5-1 in its past 10 games. The offense has been powered by senior forward Ryan Wagner, who leads the team in points with 29 in 33 games. Sophomore forward Trent Frederic, a Boston Bruins first-round pick, paces the Badgers with 15 goals.The inconsistencies for the Badgers most of the year have been in net with the tandem of senior goaltender Kyle Hayton and sophomore Jack Berry. Both goaltenders’ records are around .500 with nearly identical stat lines. Berry has a 5-5-1 record with a 2.87 goals-against average and a .903 save percentage while Hayton is 9-10-3 with a 2.84 goals-against average and a .898 save percentage.The Buckeyes also have had some shortcomings lately. Sophomore forward Tanner Laczynski, the team’s leader in assists (25) and points (37), has not recorded a point in his past five games. With Laczynski struggling, the top line of him, Weis and junior forward Freddy Gerard has cooled considerably.“I think for him, sometimes you try to do too much. I think that all of the sudden you start pressing. They got a great line and they got a good chemistry going there. I think it’s just a matter of time,” Rohlik said. “I think when he is at his best, all three of those guys are going together.” Special teams have been a strong part of Ohio State’s success, with both sides continuing to play effective roles this season. The power play has rebounded from the 0-for-21 start to the year, appearing in the top 15 in the country at 22.5 percent. The penalty kill remains No. 1 in the country at 90.7 percent. Redshirt junior goalie Sean Romeo has been the key to Ohio State’s nation-leading penalty kill. He earned his fifth Big Ten weekly award with the third star of the week on Tuesday, following a standout performance on the road against the Gophers. He remains top 10 in the country in save percentage (.927) and goals-against average (2.06).“He’s been doing it all year. Maybe he wants a couple games back, but he’s been pretty consistent,” Rohlik said. “I think that’s his nature, his routine, that’s how he prepares. Certainly when you got a guy back there that’s playing like that, it gives your team confidence.”With the success the Buckeyes have had this year, the seniors deserve credit for laying the foundation of program expectations heading into the Big Ten tournament.“To me, it’s the character and what these guys are going to leave as their legacy of what we want out of Ohio State hockey,” Rohlik said. read more

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Hog roasts and burgers falling out of fashion at outdoor festivals as

Amongst our favourites are: Breakfast radish & charred cucumber salad with mint & elderflower and jersey royal potato salad, chives, homemade mayonnaise garnished with summer flowers.“We believe that the healthy eating trend at festivals will continue, dishes will include more plant based creations making vegetables the hero ingredient.”Those planning a wedding may want to keep in mind that burgers and sausages are being shunned in favour of lighter options such as king prawns and halloumi, according to Amy Braind, the Wedding and Events Manager at the Bingham Hotel in Richmond. David Cameron at wilderness festival Oysters are preferred by some to heavier food such as burgers at festivalsCredit:ROBERT GILHOOLY To keep in British tradition minus the heavy meat pies and mash or hog roasts, ‘Best of British’  salad stalls were a big hit: serving a variety of colourful delicious seasonal salads with local produce. Oysters are preferred by some to heavier food such as burgers at festivals Those attending any sort of festival or outdoors wedding during the summer months can usually expect to detect the whiff of hog roast in the air, or the tempting aroma of a burger van.However, organisers and chefs who cater some of Britain’s top outdoor events say these traditional festival foods are falling out of fashion in favour of dinky sharing plates and light salads.Daniel Maycock, who organises the Great British Food Festival, which takes place all summer across Britain’s country houses, said: “Old traditional things seem to be struggling, especially heavy foods in the summer heat – so hog roasts, big burgers, meat pies and mash that sort of british classic festival food. In, are lighter things, hallomi, falafel, even salads!”Those who went to Wilderness last weekend were more likely to opt for crunchy radishes and colourful vegetables over a piece of charred pork, Caroline Hall, whose company Rocket Food has catered the upmarket festival.She said: “Due to the heat wave, we’ve seen an increase in demand for lighter food at our parties this summer. Big hits were:  Secret Smoked Salmon carving station, Lydersfarm Oyster beds with bespoke garnishes and seafood bars. David Cameron at Wilderness festival She said: “I would say this is definitely a trend that has grown this last year or so. Whether it’s because couples are wanting to do something a little different or are conscious that they don’t want their guests to feel uncomfortable after a meal so have room for more drinking and dancing, who knows.“The volume of food is still very important, couples don’t want their guests to go hungry but I think as a country we are now more aware of and have access to lighter delicious options that get people talking.We offer a fabulous BBQ menu which we find is incredibly popular especially over the summer months and doesn’t just include your typical burgers and sausages. In fact our most popular items are the prawn skewers, halloumi & veg skewers, lamb cutlets and couscous”. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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9 awkward wedding photos that probably didnt make the album

first_img Source: DailyEdge.ieAnd the other wedding party that didn’t learn from their mistake Source: AcidcowThe wedding cake smash that went horribly wrong Source: HeavyThe couple who almost had it Source: Awkward Family PhotosThe pastor who decided he was ‘down with the kids’ Source: ImgurThe couple that shouldn’t have trusted the wildlife Source: ComplexAnd the bride who wanted her solemn moment of reflection immortalised Source: Babble.comOh dear.The 14 signs that you’re at an Irish wedding>13 of hte worst things about being a wedding guest> ANYONE WHO HAS ever planned a wedding knows that you spend considerable amounts of money and time in the hopes of having a perfect day.Unfortunately, some things are just beyond your control.The couples in these photos will all look back and laugh in time. Perhaps a long time.The groomsman who decided to show off a bitKicking a bridesmaid and ripping his pants in the process. #ladbanter Source: RedditThe guest who ruined a touching moment Source: ImgurWe guess he doesn’t like birds?The wedding party that forgot about physics for a secondlast_img read more

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Aquaman 2 Will Hit Theaters in December 2022

first_img Top Movie and TV Trailers You Might Have Missed This WeekWatch These Movies Before ‘Hustlers’ Stay on target Aquaman, DC Comics’ underwater superhero, is coming back to the big screen: Warner Bros. announced that Aquaman 2 will hit theaters on December 16, 2022.Fans will have to wait nearly 3.5 years for the sequel, which is expected to be one of the only studio releases on that weekend, Deadline reported. Warner Bros. did not provide comment on Aquaman 2’s plot or cast yet.Aquaman 2 has a release date:12.16.2022 pic.twitter.com/W3n0v9CFeK— Fandango (@Fandango) February 27, 2019Aquaman, which was directed by James Wan, has generated more than $1.14 billion worldwide in box office sales, The Hollywood Reporter noted. The movie highlights Arthur Curry, who becomes heir to the underwater kingdom of Atlantis and saves it from an evil ruler.While details on casting remain slim, it’s likely that Jason Momoa, who played Aquaman in the first movie, will most likely return for Aquaman 2. The Hollywood Reporter also confirmed that David Leslie Johnson-McGoldrick, who co-wrote Aquaman, Peter Safran, Aquaman’s producer, and Wan will return for the superhero sequel.Ready for a dive? One week until #Aquaman is available on Digital.https://t.co/CRzvAqibIC pic.twitter.com/UxkqabvzmC— Aquaman Movie (@aquamanmovie) February 26, 2019There’s still a lot of time before Aquaman 2 hits the big screen, but Aquaman is available for pre-order online.More on Geek.com:‘Aquaman’ Movie Posters Are So Extra for a Superhero FlickAmazon Baits Prime Customers With Advanced ‘Aquaman’ ScreeningMovieBob Reviews: Aquamanlast_img read more

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Kalyana Shaadi cheques presented

first_imgHabsiguda: MLA Bethi Subhash Reddy distributed cheques to 70 beneficiaries under Kalyana Lakshmi and Shaadi Mubarak schemes at his camp office here on Wednesday. He lauded Chief Minister K Chandrashekar Rao for implementing several welfare schemes.Local corporator Bethi Swapna Reddy, Uppal Tahsildar Prameela Rani, local leaders L Raghupathi Reddy, J Venkateshwar Reddy, G Sudhakar, V Santosh Reddy, N Shiva, P Mahender Reddy and others were present.last_img

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Plants Vs Zombies Garden Warfare quick review

first_imgMaybe it’s because there’s nothing else to do on the Xbox One. Maybe it’s because I’m tired of the pay-to-win version of PzV2 on my tablet. Maybe it’s because this looks like it could be a ton of fun and actually has a local multiplayer gameplay mode unlike almost everything else we’ve seen for this console so far. For whatever reason, I picked up a copy of Plants Vs Zombies: Garden Warfare today. Here’s a quick look at what I found so far.The surface has only barely been scratched, and so far there’s a lot about this game that makes it difficult to enjoy. The gameplay rules are inconsistent, there’s not much in the way of a tutorial to explain what is going on, and Origin is no less terrible when you put dancing flowers around it and call it really great. Two of those things are easy enough to fix (especially for a first day), and the other can be ignored or played around… if you’re good enough.The gameplay isn’t particularly new, you choose between a host of familiar looking characters that have a Battlefield-esque set of strengths and weaknesses, and use that to defend your garden for ten waves. You gain experience in the game by action, which in turn gives you new abilities. What makes this thoroughly overused gameplay mechanic fun is the Plants Vs Zombies universe itself. The amusing animation, clever jabs at pop culture, and complete lack of anything even remotely military creates a relaxed setting for you to just enjoy yourself. Fortunately for PopCap and EA, that’s apparently all you need.While it’s frustrating to see sloppy things like bushes that the burrowing plants inexplicably can’t pass under or the fixed scenery that explodes but doesn’t move or hurt the enemy, the game is a lot of fun if you’re into shooters at all. The addition of SmartGlass for tactics in larger combat environments gives a unique perspective to the game, but really it’s the lighthearted tone that sells the game.Just wandering around the PvZ world is a good time, and that’s a huge part of why this is not going to be a game that sells consoles but it will surely be something that anyone who is a fan of shooters should add to their Xbox One game list. VIEW PHOTO GALLERY Zombie referenceZombie referenceMore Zombie ArtZombie Graffiti Zombie Propagandalast_img read more

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Photon afterglow could transmit information without transmitting energy

first_img © 2015 Phys.org Spacetime diagram of the scientists’ proposed set-up, where the dotted lines indicate the first and last light rays emanating from Alice. Although no energy is transmitted, the receiver (Bob) must provide the energy needed to detect the incoming signal. Credit: Jonsson, et al. ©2015 American Physical Society More information: Robert H. Jonsson, et al. “Information Transmission Without Energy Exchange.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.110505 Explore further The physicists, Robert H. Jonsson, Eduardo Martín-Martínez, and Achim Kempf, at the University of Waterloo (Martín-Martínez and Kempf are also with the Perimeter Institute), have published a paper on the concept in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.Currently, any information transmission protocol also involves energy transmission. This is because these protocols use real photons to transmit information, and all real photons carry energy, so the information and energy are inherently intertwined.Most of the time when we talk about electromagnetic fields and photons, we are talking about real photons. The light that reaches our eyes, for example, consists only of real photons, which carry both information and energy. However, all electromagnetic fields contain not only real photons, but also virtual photons, which can be thought of as “imprints on the quantum vacuum.” The new discovery shows that, in certain circumstances, virtual photons that do not carry energy can be used to transmit information.The physicists showed how to achieve this energy-less information transmission by doing two things:”First, we use quantum antennas, i.e., antennas that are in a quantum superposition of states,” Kempf told Phys.org. “For example, with current quantum optics technology, atoms can be used as such antennas. Secondly, we use the fact that, when real photons are emitted (and propagate at the speed of light), the photons leave a small afterglow of virtual photons that propagate slower than light. This afterglow does not carry energy (in contrast to real photons), but it does carry information about the event that generated the light. Receivers can ‘tap’ into that afterglow, spending energy to recover information about light that passed by a long time ago.”The proposed protocol has another somewhat unusual requirement: it can only take place in spacetimes with dimensions in which virtual photons can travel slower than the speed of light. For instance, the afterglow would not occur in our 3+1 dimensional spacetime if spacetime were completely flat. However, our spacetime does have some curvature, and that makes the afterglow possible.These ideas also have implications for cosmology. In a paper to be published in a future issue of Physical Review Letters, Martín-Martínez and collaborators A. Blasco, L. Garay, and M. Martin-Benito have investigated these implications.”In that work, it is shown that the afterglow of events that happened in the early Universe carries more information than the light that reaches us from those events,” Martín-Martínez said. “This is surprising because, up until now, it has been believed that real quanta, such as real photons of light, are the only carriers of information from the early Universe.”The new protocol could also have practical applications for quantum communication technology.”The afterglow also occurs in flat spacetime of dimensions other than 3+1,” Jonsson said. “It occurs, in particular, in the case where there is only one spatial dimension, such as is effectively the case in an optical fiber. We are currently investigating applications of our results to quantum communication through optical fibers.” Confirming Einstein, scientists find ‘spacetime foam’ not slowing down photons from faraway gamma-ray burst (Update)center_img Journal information: Physical Review Letters (Phys.org)—Physicists have theoretically shown that it is possible to transmit information from one location to another without transmitting energy. Instead of using real photons, which always carry energy, the technique uses a small, newly predicted quantum afterglow of virtual photons that do not need to carry energy. Although no energy is transmitted, the receiver must provide the energy needed to detect the incoming signal—similar to the way that an individual must pay to receive a collect call. Citation: Photon ‘afterglow’ could transmit information without transmitting energy (2015, March 31) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-03-photon-afterglow-transmit-transmitting-energy.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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